Thursday, April 30

Collared falconet

   ›      ›   Collared falconet - Microhierax caerulescens.

The collared falconet (Microhierax caerulescens) belongs to the family Falconidae. The collared falconet species is distributed in India, Nepal, Bangladesh and Bhutan in Indian Subcontinent, Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Malaysia and Vietnam.

Taxonomy of Collared falconet

  • Scientific Name: Microhierax caerulescens
  • Common Name: Collared falconet
  • French: Fauconnet à collier; German: Rotkehlfälkchen; Spanish: Falconete acollarado;
  • Other names: Falco caerulescens Linnaeus, 1758;
  • Family: Falconidae › Falconiformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • Species author: (Linnaeus, 1758)
Microhierax caerulescens was earlier included in the genus Falco. The two recognized subspecies are: M. c. caerulescens (Linnaeus, 1758) and M. c. burmanicus Swann, 1920.

Indian birds - Image of Collared falconet - Microhierax caerulescens
Indian birds - Image of Collared falconet - Microhierax caerulescens

Description

The collared falconet is a small falconet, measuring 15 to 20 cm in length and weighing 30 to 50 grams. Both males and females look alike. The wingspan is 30 to 35 cm. It is a small falcon, very shrike-like in shape, mainly pied and having bold white supercilia and collar. The double-toothed bill is relatively heavy. The wings are short and the tail is of medium-length. The legs are strong and half-feathered with powerful feet.

Habitat

The collared falconet birds inhabit open deciduous forest, clearings and edges in evergreen forest.

Feeding habits

The collared falconet birds feed on large insects like grasshoppers, butterflies and large beetles.

Breeding

These falconet birds breeding during February to May.

Distribution

These falconet subspecies M. c. caerulescens is distributed in Nepal and in the states of Uttarakhand, West Bengal Odisha, Uttar Pradesh, Sikkim and Assam in India. The subspecies M. c. burmanicus is distributed in Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Malaysia and Vietnam.

Movement Patterns

These falconet are considered sedentary and move about in the region of their occurrence.

Status and conservation

The collared falconet species have an extremely large range and are considered least vulnerable. The population appears to be stable. Habitat degradation and felling of trees are threats in their conservation.

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated these falconet birds and has listed them as of "Least Concern".

Biological classification of Microhierax caerulescens
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Falconiformes
Family:Falconidae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Microhierax
Species:M. caerulescens
Binomial name:Microhierax caerulescens
Distribution:India, Nepal, Bangladesh and Bhutan in Indian Subcontinent, Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Malaysia and Vietnam;
Feeding habits:large insects;
IUCN status listing:
Least Concern

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Wednesday, April 29

Jerdon's baza

   ›      ›   Jerdon's baza - Aviceda jerdoni.

The Jerdon's baza (Aviceda jerdoni) belongs to the family Accipitridae. The Jerdon's baza species is distributed in India, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Malaysia, Southern China, Thailand, Indonesia and Philippines.

Taxonomy of Jerdon's baza

  • Scientific Name: Aviceda jerdoni
  • Common Name: Jerdon's baza
  • French: Baza de Jerdon; German: Hinduweih; Spanish: Baza oriental;
  • Other names: Pernis Jerdoni Blyth, 1842;
  • Family: Accipitridae › Accipitriformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • Species author: (Blyth, 1842)
Aviceda jerdoni was earlier included in the genus Pernis. The five recognized subspecies are: A. j. ceylonensis (Legge, 1876), A. j. jerdoni (Blyth, 1842), A. j. borneensis (Brüggemann, 1876), A. j. magnirostris (Kaup, 1847) and A. j. celebensis (Schlegel, 1873).

Indian birds -Image of Jerdon's baza - Aviceda jerdoni
Indian birds - Jerdon's baza - Aviceda jerdoni

Description

The Jerdon's baza is a medium sized brown hawk, measuring 40 to 50 cm in length and weighing 350 grams. The wingspan is 120 cm. It has a thin white tipped black crest usually held erect. These baza birds have very broad and rounded paddle-shaped wings. The underparts are plain and pale. The chin is white.

Habitat

These birds inhabit foothills in the terai and margins of evergreen forests and tea estates.

Feeding habits

The Jerdon's baza feed on large insects, lizards and small rodents.

Breeding

The baza bird breeds throughout the year, except for summer months.

Distribution

These baza subspecies A. j. ceylonensis is distributed in South India and Sri Lanka. The subspecies A. j. jerdoni is distributed in Sikkim, West Bengal and Assam States of India, Myanmar and Sumatra Island of Indonesia. The subspecies A. j. borneensis is distributed in Borneo Island. The subspecies A. j. magnirostris occurs in Philippines. The subspecies A. j. celebensis occurs in Sulawesi Island, Togian Island, Banggai Island and Sula Island of Indonesia.

Movement Patterns

These bird species is sedentary and recorded throughout the year in the habitat.

Status and conservation

The Jerdon's baza population is estimated to number between 1,000 to 10,000 individual birds. These species have very wide range and are considered least vulnerable. The population is suspected to be in decline. The habitat destruction is the threat to conservation of these species.

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated these baza birds and has listed them as of "Least Concern".

Biological classification of Aviceda jerdoni
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Accipitriformes
Family:Accipitridae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Aviceda
Species:A. jerdoni
Binomial name:Aviceda jerdoni
Distribution:Asia, India, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, South China, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia and Philippines;
Feeding habits:large insects, reptiles and small mammals;
IUCN status listing:
Least Concern

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Tuesday, April 28

Osprey

   ›      ›   Osprey - Pandion haliaetus.

The osprey (Pandion haliaetus) belongs to the family Pandionidae. The osprey species is distributed in Indian Subcontinent, Asia, Europe, Australia, Africa and Americas.

Taxonomy of Osprey

  • Scientific Name: Pandion haliaetus
  • Common Name: Osprey
  • French: Balbuzard pêcheur; German: Fischadler; Spanish: Águila pescadora;
  • Other names: Falco haliaetus Linnaeus, 1758; fish eagle; sea hawk; river hawk; fish hawk;
  • Family: Pandionidae › Accipitriformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • Species author: (Linnaeus, 1758)
Pandion haliaetus was earlier included in the genus Falco. The four recognized subspecies are: P. h. haliaetus (Linnaeus, 1758), P. h. carolinensis (J. F. Gmelin, 1788), P. h. ridgwayi Maynard, 1887 and P. h. cristatus (Vieillot, 1816).

Indian birds - Image of Osprey - Pandion haliaetus
Indian birds - Osprey - Pandion haliaetus

Description

The osprey is a large bird, measuring 55 to 60 cm in length and weighing 1,000 to 1,800 grams. The female osprey bird is larger and weighs 1,200 to 2,000 grams. The wingspan is 120 to 175 cm. It is glossy brown on the upper parts. The head and underparts are greyish white. The dark patch across the eyes reaches to the sides of the neck. The irises of the eyes are golden to brown, and the transparent nictitating membrane is pale blue. The feet are white with black talons. The tail of osprey is short. The wings are narrow and long, with four long, finger-like feathers, and a shorter fifth. The osprey bird call is cheep, cheep or yewk, yewk. When disturbed it may make a sharp sound 'cheereek'.

Habitat

The osprey prefers shallow, fresh, brackish or marine habitats. It is found fishing in ponds, lakes, marshes, lagoons and creeks.

Feeding habits

The main feed of osprey bird is fish. It plunges feet first into water and grabs the fish with its talons. Occasionally, the osprey may feed on rodents, frogs and other birds.

Breeding

The breeding season of osprey birds varies with region. They construct nest on high trees, rocky outcrops and manmade structures, closer to water sources. The nest is a platform of twigs, sticks and plant material. They are monogamous. Two to four eggs are laid and the parents take care of the chicks.

Distribution

The osprey bird subspecies P. h. haliaetus is distributed in Europe, Asia, Africa, Southeast Asia and Indian Subcontinent. The subspecies P. h. carolinensis is distributed in North America and South America. The subspecies P. h. ridgwayi is distributed in Caribbean. The subspecies P. h. cristatus is distributed in Indonesia, New Guinea, Australia, Solomon Islands and New Caledonia.

Movement Patterns

The osprey populations in tropical and subtropical regions are sedentary. The osprey birds from Europe migrate to Africa for wintering. The North American birds move southwards for wintering.

Status and conservation

The osprey species has an extremely large range and it is considered least vulnerable. The global osprey population is estimated at 460,000 individual birds. Hunting of adult birds, collection of eggs, use agricultural pesticides, disturbance in breeding habitats and feeling of tall trees are the main threats in the conservation.

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated these Osprey birds and has listed them as of "Least Concern".

Biological classification of Pandion haliaetus
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Accipitriformes
Family:Pandionidae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Pandion
Species:P. haliaetus
Binomial name:Pandion haliaetus
Distribution:Asia, Indian Subcontinent, Europe, Australia, Africa and Americas;
Feeding habits:fish;
IUCN status listing:
Least Concern

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Monday, April 27

Oriental darter

   ›      ›   Oriental darter - Anhinga melanogaster.

The Oriental darter (Anhinga melanogaster) belongs to the family Anhingidae. The Oriental darter species is distributed in Indian Subcontinent, Myanmar, Thailand and Indonesia.

Taxonomy of Oriental darter

  • Scientific Name: Anhinga melanogaster
  • Common Name: Oriental darter
  • French: Anhinga roux; German: Orient-Schlangenhalsvogel; Spanish: Anhinga asiática;
  • Other names: Anhinga melanogaster Pennant, 1769; Darter; snakebird;
  • Family: Anhingidae › Suliformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • Species author: (Pennant, 1769)
Anhinga melanogaster is closely related to American (A. anhinga), African (A. rufa) and Australasian (A. novaehollandiae) darter species. It is also known as Plotus melanogaster.

Indian birds - Image of Oriental darter - Anhinga melanogaster
Indian birds - Oriental darter - Anhinga melanogaster

Description

The Oriental darter is a large bird, measuring 85 to 100 cm in length and weighing 1,000 to 1,800 grams. The wingspan is 115 to 130 cm. The bill is long and measures 7 to 8 cm. These birds have wettable feathers and are often seen perched on rock or tree branch, holding the wings open for drying. These darter birds have long slender neck. The crown and neck of the bird are brown, darkening downwards to become black in the body plumage. The wing coverts and tertials having silvery streaks along the shaft.

There is a pale line over the eye and throat and a line runs along the sides of the neck. The iris is white with a yellow ring around it. The breeding birds have darker grey tarsi and toes with yellow webbing. The tail is long and made up of twelve stiff feathers. The Oriental darter birds produce grunting and croaking sounds and a disyllabic chigi-chigi-chigi call.

Habitat

The Oriental darter birds inhabit freshwater habitats like ponds, lakes, swamps, reservoirs and slow moving streams.

Feeding habits

The Oriental darter spears prey under water with its long pointed bill, brings it above water and tosses it into the air before swallowing.

Breeding

The breeding season of Oriental darter is June to August in northern India, April–May in southwestern India and in winter in southeastern India. They construct platform nests with twigs on tree branches. The clutch usually has three to six spindle shaped bluish-green eggs. The chicks feed by thrusting their heads down the throat of their parents.

Distribution

The Oriental darter distributed in the Indian Subcontinent and southeast Asia. They are distributed in Pakistan, India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia, Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei and Indonesia.

Movement Patterns

The Oriental darter is mainly sedentary. It may locally move in search of feed and water bodies.

Status and conservation

The population of darter birds is estimated to number about 33,000 individual birds. These Oriental darter birds are generally becoming uncommon and declining throughout Asia. They are considered near threatened. Habitat loss, human activities near breeding habitats, degradation of foraging areas, hunting and pollution are the main threats for their conservation.

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated these darter birds and has listed them as "Near Threatened".

Biological classification of Anhinga melanogaster
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Suliformes
Family:Anhingidae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Anhinga
Species:A. melanogaster
Binomial name:Anhinga melanogaster
Distribution:Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei, Indonesia and Sri Lanka;
Feeding habits:fish, water snakes, crustaceans and amphibians;
IUCN status listing:
Near Threatened

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Sunday, April 26

Little cormorant

   ›      ›   Little cormorant - Microcarbo niger.

The little cormorant (Microcarbo niger) belongs to the family Phalacrocoracidae. The little cormorant species is distributed in Indian Subcontinent, Myanmar, Thailand and Indonesia.

Taxonomy of Little cormorant

  • Scientific Name: Microcarbo niger
  • Common Name: Little cormorant
  • French: Cormoran de Vieillot; German: Mohrenscharbe; Spanish: Cormorán de Java;
  • Other names: Hydrocorax niger Vieillot, 1817; Javanese cormorant;
  • Family: Phalacrocoracidae › Suliformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • Species author: (Vieillot, 1817)
Microcarbo niger bird is also known as Halietor niger, Phalacrocorax niger and Phalacrocorax javanicus.

Indian birds - Little cormorant - Microcarbo niger
Indian birds - Little cormorant - Microcarbo niger

Description

The little cormorant is a small bird, measuring 50 to 55 cm in length and weighing 360 to 520 grams. The male bird is slightly larger. The wingspan is 90 cm. The breeding cormorant birds have black or brown-black plumage and a longish tail. Adults have a small erectile crest on the fore crown. The non breeding birds have a white patch on the throat. The webbed feet are black. Little cormorants produce low roaring, grunting and groaning sounds. They also make a low pitched ah-ah-ah and kok-kok-kok calls.

Habitat

These birds are seen in both inland and coastal water bodies. They are found in village ponds, estuaries, lagoons, creeks, tidal flats, marshes, swamps, fish ponds, lakes and streams.

Feeding habits

The little cormorant birds mostly feed on fish and sometimes also crustaceans and amphibians. They dive to catch the prey and surface to swallow it.

Breeding

These cormorant birds breed mainly during June to August in North India and November to February in southern India. The nest is constructed on trees. The clutch has two to six eggs.

Distribution

These bird species is distributed in Indian Subcontinent, Myanmar, Thailand and Indonesia.

Movement Patterns

The little cormorant species are mostly sedentary and make local movements in search of feed and roosts.

Status and conservation

The global population of these cormorant birds is not estimated. The overall population trend is not known. These birds are considered least vulnerable. Hunting of these birds, persecution from the aquaculture industry and breeding habitat degradation are the threats in conservation of these birds.

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated these cormorant birds and has listed them as of "Least Concern".

Biological classification of Microcarbo niger
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Suliformes
Family:Phalacrocoracidae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Microcarbo
Species:M. niger
Binomial name:Microcarbo niger
Distribution:Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Nepal and Sri Lanka in Indian Subcontinent, Myanmar, Thailand and Indonesia (Java);
Feeding habits:fish, crustaceans and amphibians;
IUCN status listing:
Least Concern

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Saturday, April 25

Great cormorant

   ›      ›   Great cormorant - Phalacrocorax carbo.

The great cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) belongs to the family Phalacrocoracidae. The great cormorant species is distributed in Indian Subcontinent, Asia, Africa, Europe, North America and Australia.

Taxonomy of Great cormorant

  • Scientific Name: Phalacrocorax carbo
  • Common Name: Great cormorant
  • French: Grand Cormoran; German: Kormoran; Spanish: Cormorán grande;
  • Other names: Pelecanus carbo Linnaeus, 1758; black shag; large cormorant; black cormorant; great black cormorant;
  • Family: Phalacrocoracidae › Suliformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • Species author: (Linnaeus, 1758)
Phalacrocorax carbo bird was earlier placed under genus Pelecanus. The six recognized subspecies are: P. c. carbo (Linnaeus, 1758), P. c. sinensis (Staunton, 1796), P. c. hanedae Nagamichi Kuroda, 1925, P. c. maroccanus E. J. O. Hartert, 1906, P. c. lucidus (M. H. C. Lichtenstein, 1823) and P. c. novaehollandiae Stephens, 1826.

Indian birds - Great cormorant - Phalacrocorax carbo
Indian birds - Great cormorant - Phalacrocorax carbo

Description

The great cormorant is a large bird, measuring 80 to 100 cm in length and weighing 1,800 to 2,800 grams. The female cormorant is slightly smaller. The wingspan is 130 to 160 cm. These cormorant birds are black with a longish tail. Adults have white patches on the thighs and on the throat in the breeding season. They may have a yellow throat-patch.

Habitat

The great cormorant birds are seen in both inland and coastal water bodies. They are found in estuaries, lagoons, creeks, tidal flats, marshes, swamps, fish ponds, lakes and streams.

Feeding habits

These cormorant birds mostly feed on fish and sometimes also feed crustaceans, molluscs and amphibians. They dive to catch the prey and surface to swallow it.

Breeding

The great cormorant birds breed during April to June in temperate regions. They appear to breed year-round in tropics. The nest is constructed as a platform on trees. In some places they nest on the ground. The clutch has three to four eggs.

Distribution

The subspecies P. c. carbo is distributed in North America, Southern Europe and Northern Africa. The subspecies P. c. sinensis is distributed in Europe, Asia, Indian Subcontinent and Africa. The subspecies P. c. hanedae Nagamichi is distributed in Japan. The subspecies P. c. maroccanus occurs in Northwest Africa. The subspecies P. c. lucidus occurs in Africa. The subspecies P. c. novaehollandiae occurs in Australia, Tasmania and New Zealand.

Movement Patterns

The great cormorant species in temperate regions move southwards for wintering. The birds in the tropical and subtropical regions are mostly Sedentary.

Status and conservation

The global population of great cormorant birds is estimated to be between 1,400,000 to 2,900,000 individual birds. The overall population trend is increasing. These birds are considered least vulnerable. Hunting of these birds, persecution from the aquaculture industry and breeding habitat degradation are the threats in conservation of these birds.

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated these cormorant birds and has listed them as of "Least Concern".

Biological classification of Phalacrocorax carbo
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Suliformes
Family:Phalacrocoracidae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Phalacrocorax
Species:P. carbo
Binomial name:Phalacrocorax carbo
Distribution:North America, Europe, Asia, Indian Subcontinent, Africa and Australia;
Feeding habits:fish, crustaceans and amphibians;
IUCN status listing:
Least Concern

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Friday, April 24

Indian cormorant

   ›      ›   Indian cormorant - Phalacrocorax fuscicollis.

The Indian cormorant (Phalacrocorax fuscicollis) belongs to the family Phalacrocoracidae. The Indian cormorant species is distributed in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Thailand, Vietnam and Cambodia.

Taxonomy of Indian cormorant

  • Scientific Name: Phalacrocorax fuscicollis
  • Common Name: Indian cormorant
  • French: Cormoran à cou brun; German: Braunwangenscharbe; Spanish: Cormorán indio;
  • Other names: Indian shag;
  • Family: Phalacrocoracidae › Suliformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • Species author: Stephens, 1826
Phalacrocorax fuscicollis bird is sometimes placed under genus Hypoleucos.

Description

The Indian cormorant is a medium sized bird, measuring, 60 cm in length and weighing 600 to 800 grams. These birds have a long tail and long thin bill ending in hooked tip. A characteristic of these birds is the blue color of the eyes. It is bronze brown colored and the upper plumage is scalloped in black. Breeding birds have a short white ear tuft. They make short harsh “grk” call or make sounds like “kit”.
Phalacrocorax fuscicollis
Indian cormorant - Phalacrocorax fuscicollis

Habitat

These birds are found both in freshwater and saline habitats. They occur in ponds, lakes, streams, creeks and lagoons. They avoid open coasts.

Feeding habits

The Indian cormorant birds feed mainly on fish and catch the prey by diving in the waters. They are seen moving in a formation to corner fish.

Breeding

The breeding season in northern India is between July to February and in southern parts is between November to February. These birds nest on half submerged trees and trees in islands. The nest is built with twigs. The usual clutch is three to five eggs.

Distribution

These species are distributed in Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam.

Movement Patterns

This cormorant is a resident bird and moves locally in search of feed and water bodies.

Status and conservation

These bird species have a very large range and are considered least vulnerable. Habitat degradation, human activity in the breeding habitats and drying up of water bodies are the major threats to their survival.

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated these cormorant birds and has listed them as of "Least Concern".

Biological classification of Phalacrocorax fuscicollis
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Suliformes
Family:Phalacrocoracidae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Phalacrocorax
Species:P. fuscicollis
Binomial name:Phalacrocorax fuscicollis
Distribution:Pakistan, India and Sri Lanka, Thailand and Cambodia;
Feeding habits:fish;
IUCN status listing:
Least Concern

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Thursday, April 23

Brown booby

   ›      ›   Brown booby - Sula leucogaster.

The brown booby (Sula leucogaster) belongs to the family Sulidae. The brown booby species is distributed in Atlantic Ocean, Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean. It is a rare visitor to Indian Islands.

Taxonomy of Brown booby

  • Scientific Name: Sula leucogaster
  • Common Name: Brown booby
  • French: Fou brun; German: Weißbauchtölpel; Spanish: Piquero pardo;
  • Other names: Pelecanus leucogaster Boddaert, 1783;
  • Family: Sulidae › Suliformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • Species author: (Boddaert, 1783)
Brown booby species was earlier included in the genus Pelecanus. The four recognized subspecies are: S. l. leucogaster (Boddaert, 1783), S. l. plotus (J. R. Forster, 1844), S. l. brewsteri Goss, 1888 and S. l. etesiaca Thayer & Bangs, 1905.

Indian birds - Brown booby - Sula leucogaster
Indian birds - Brown booby - Sula leucogaster

Description

The brown booby bird is a large bird, measuring 65 to 75 cm in length and weighing 700 to 1,550 grams. The wingspan is 130 to 150 cm. The female booby bird is slightly larger. The head and the upper body of this bird is brown-black. The belly is a contrasting white. The wings are short and the tail is tapered and long. The beak of booby is large and pointed with many jagged edges.

Habitat

The brown booby birds are strictly marine and move near around their breeding habitats in tropical rocky or coral islands.

Feeding habits

The brown booby birds feed mainly on squids and flying fish. These booby bird usually catch the prey by plunge diving and also by plucking the prey out of water surface. They also snatch feed from other seabirds.

Breeding

The breeding in these booby birds is seasonal in some areas and continuous is some areas. The nest is usually built on the ground in the midst of vegetation in remote islands. These booby birds form small colonies.

Distribution

The subspecies S. l. leucogaster is distributed in the islands in Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean and tropical Atlantic Ocean. The subspecies S. l. plotus is distributed in Red Sea, Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean. The subspecies S. l. brewsteri is distributed in tropical Pacific Ocean and The subspecies S. l. etesiaca occurs in Pacific Ocean.

Movement Patterns

These booby birds are strictly marine and move about near the breeding grounds. Juveniles and non breeding birds may disperse widely.

Status and conservation

The global population of brown booby birds is estimated to be about 200,000 individual birds. The population is slowly declining due habitat loss and human activities in the breeding habitat. These bird species have an extremely large range and are considered least vulnerable.

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated these booby species and has listed them as of "Least Concern".

Biological classification of Sula leucogaster
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Suliformes
Family:Sulidae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Sula
Species:S. leucogaster
Binomial name:Sula leucogaster
Distribution:tropical Atlantic Ocean, Indian Ocean, Pacific Ocean, Red sea and rare visitor to Indian islands;
Feeding habits:squid, flying fish and other fish;
IUCN status listing:
Least Concern

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Image source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Brown_boobytern.JPG
Author: Duncan Wright | License: Public domain.
Current topic in Birds of India: Brown booby - Sula leucogaster.
Contact State Tourism or travel agents for bird watching and wildlife tours.