Tuesday, June 30

Crested serpent eagle

   ›      ›   Crested serpent eagle - Spilornis cheela.

The crested serpent eagle (Spilornis cheela) belongs to the family Accipitridae. These crested serpent eagle species are distributed in Indian Subcontinent, Southeast Asia and East Asia.

Taxonomy of Crested serpent eagle

  • Scientific Name: Spilornis cheela
  • Common Name: Crested serpent eagle
  • French: Serpentaire bacha; German: Schlangenweihe; Spanish: Culebrera chiíla;
  • Other names: Falco Cheela Latham, 1790;
  • Family: Accipitridae › Accipitriformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • Species author: Latham, 1790
Spilornis cheela is closely related to S. klossi, S. holospilus, S. kinabaluensis and S. rufipectus. It was earlier included in the genus Falco.
The twenty one recognized subspecies are: S. c. perplexus, S. c. cheela, S. c. melanotis, S. c. spilogaster, S. c. burmanicus, S. c. davisoni, S. c. ricketti, S. c. hoya, S. c. rutherfordi, S. c. malayensis, S. c. batu, S. c. palawanensis, S. c. pallidus, S. c. richmondi, S. c. bido, S. c. minimus, S. c. abbotti, S. c. asturinus, S. c. sipora, S. c. natunensis and S. c. baweanus.

Indian birds - Image of Crested serpent eagle - Spilornis cheela
Indian birds - Image of Crested serpent eagle - Spilornis cheela

Description

The crested serpent eagle is a medium sized bird, measuring 50 to 75 cm in length and weighing 400 to 1,800 grams. The wingspan is 100 to 170 cm. Considering the large number of subspecies of these eagles, there is wide variation in size and appearance. They have a large head with long feathers on the back of the head giving crested appearance. The face is bare and yellow. The yellow feet are unfeathered and heavily scaled. The wings are rounded and the tail is short. The tail has wide white and black bars. Their call is a loud, piercing, distinctive Kluee-wip-wip sound.

Habitat

The crested serpent eagle inhabit a wide variety of tropical and subtropical forests with thick vegetation both on the low hills and the plains. They hunt over forests and wet grasslands.

Feeding habits

The crested serpent eagle feed mainly on snakes and lizards. They may also prey on small mammals, birds, fish, frogs and crabs.

Breeding

The crested serpent eagle breeding season starts in the late winter. The nest is a large platform made of sticks and is lined with leaves. both the male and female eagles take part in nest building. The usual clutch is one egg. The female eagle incubates the egg. Both the parent eagles take part in raising the chick.

Distribution

The crested serpent eagle subspecies S. c. perplexus is distributed in Ryukyu Islands of Japan. S. c. cheela is distributed in Pakistan, North India, Nepal and Bangladesh. S. c. melanotis is distributed in peninsular India, Gujarat and Gangetic Plain. S. c. spilogaster is distributed in Sri Lanka. S. c. burmanicus is distributed in Myanmar, Southern China and Thailand. S. c. davisoni is distributed in Andaman Islands of India. The crested serpent eagle subspecies S. c. ricketti is distributed in Southeast China and North Vietnam. S. c. hoya is distributed in Taiwan. S. c. rutherfordi is distributed in Hainan in China. S. c. malayensis is distributed in Peninsular Malaysia and North Sumatra. S. c. batu is distributed in Batu Islands. S. c. palawanensis is distributed in Philippines. S. c. pallidus is distributed in north Borneo in Indonesia. S. c. richmondi is distributed in South Borneo in Indonesia. The crested serpent eagle subspecies S. c. bido is distributed in Java and Bali in Indonesia. S. c. minimus is distributed in Central Nicobar Islands of India. S. c. abbotti is distributed in Simeulue Island of Indonesia. The eagle subspecies S. c. asturinus is distributed in Nias Islands of Indonesia. S. c. sipora is distributed in Mentawai Islands of Indonesia. S. c. natunensis is distributed in Natuna Islands of Indonesia. The eagle subspecies S. c. baweanus is distributed in Bawean Island of Indonesia.

Movement Patterns

The crested serpent eagle are sedentary in their ranges. The juveniles may disperse widely.

Status and conservation

The crested serpent eagle global population size has not been quantified, but it is common in its ranges and considered least vulnerable. Habitat loss and loss of tree cover are the main threats for the survival of these eagle species.

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated these eagle species and has listed them as of "Least Concern".

Biological classification of Spilornis cheela
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Accipitriformes
Family:Accipitridae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Spilornis
Species:S. cheela
Binomial name:Spilornis cheela
Distribution:Indian Subcontinent, Southeast Asia and East Asia;
Feeding habits:reptiles like snakes and lizards; also on small mammals, crabs, fish, frogs and birds;
IUCN status listing:
Least Concern

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Sunday, June 28

Great Nicobar serpent-eagle

   ›      ›   Great Nicobar serpent-eagle - Spilornis klossi.

The Great Nicobar serpent-eagle (Spilornis klossi) belongs to the family Accipitridae. These Great Nicobar serpent-eagle species are endemic to Great Nicobar islands of India.

Taxonomy of Great Nicobar serpent-eagle

  • Scientific Name: Spilornis klossi
  • Common Name: Great Nicobar serpent-eagle
  • French: Serpentaire menu; German: Kloss-Schlangenweihe; Spanish: Culebrera de Nicobar;
  • Other names: Nicobar Serpent-eagle;
  • Family: Accipitridae › Accipitriformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • Species author: Richmond, 1902
Spilornis klossi is closely related to S. cheela, S. holospilus, S. kinabaluensis and S. rufipectus.

Indian birds - Image of Spilornis klossi
Indian birds - Image of Great Nicobar serpent-eagle - Spilornis klossi

Description

These eagle species are small birds, measuring 40 to 45 cm in length. The wingspan is 85 to 95 cm. They have a large head with relatively flat crown. The wings and tail are short. Little is known about their calls and sounds they make.

Habitat

These eagle species are found to inhabit mixed evergreen forest, grassland and regenerating habitats. They are seen most frequently in the canopy of the forests.

Feeding habits

These eagles preys on reptiles like snakes and lizards. They also prey on small birds like doves.

Breeding

Not much is known about the breeding habits of these species.

Distribution

These serpent eagle species are endemic to forests on the Indian island of Great Nicobar, Little Nicobar, Menchal, Pilo Milo and Treis in the South Nicobar island group.

Movement Patterns

These serpent eagle species are sedentary in their habitat.

Status and conservation

The Great Nicobar serpent-eagle global population size had not been quantified, but it is considered common in the endemic habitats. An unquantified population decline is suspected and these species are considered near threatened. Steady habitat loss due to human activities is the present threat to their survival.

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated these eagle species and has listed them as "Near Threatened".

Biological classification of Spilornis klossi
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Accipitriformes
Family:Accipitridae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Spilornis
Species:S. klossi
Binomial name:Spilornis klossi
Distribution:endemic to forests on the Indian island of Great Nicobar;
Feeding habits:lizards and small birds;
IUCN status listing:
Near Threatened

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Saturday, June 27

Short-toed snake eagle

   ›      ›   Short-toed snake eagle - Circaetus gallicus.

The short-toed snake eagle (Circaetus gallicus) belongs to the family Accipitridae. These short-toed snake eagle species are distributed in Indian Subcontinent, Asia, Europe, Africa and Southeast Asia.

Taxonomy of Short-toed snake eagle

  • Scientific Name: Circaetus gallicus
  • Common Name: Short-toed snake eagle
  • French: Circaète Jean-le-Blanc; German: Schlangenadler; Spanish: Culebrera europea;
  • Other names: Falco gallicus J. F. Gmelin, 1788; Short-toed eagle;
  • Family: Accipitridae › Accipitriformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • Species author: (Gmelin, 1788)
Circaetus gallicus was earlier included in genus Falco. It is closely related to C. beaudouini and C. pectoralis.

Indian birds - Image of Short-toed snake eagle - Circaetus gallicus
Indian birds - Image of Short-toed snake eagle - Circaetus gallicus

Description

The short-toed snake eagle measures 60 to 70 cm in length and weighs 1,200 to 2,000 grams. The female eagle is slightly larger and weighs 1,300 to 2,300 grams. The wingspan is 160 to 190 cm. It has predominantly white underside and the upper parts are greyish brown. It has a rounded head and the chin, throat and upper breast are a pale brown. There are 3 to 4 bars in the tail. The face is owl-like and the eyes are bright yellow. The eagle call is a variety of musical whistling sounds.

Habitat

The short-toed snake eagle uses a variety of habitats such as open cultivated plains, arid and stony lands, deciduous scrub areas, foothills and semi-desert areas within warm temperate and tropical environments.

Feeding habits

The short-toed eagle feeds mainly on snakes and lizards. Sometimes it is found to prey on small mammals and birds.

Breeding

The short-toed snake eagle breeds during December and February in Indian subcontinent. It usually nests in trees and lays a single egg.

Distribution

The short-toed snake eagle is distributed in North Africa, Mediterranean region, southern Europe, Russia, the Middle East, Iran, China and Mongolia in Asia, Indian Subcontinent, southeast Asia and Indonesian islands.

Movement Patterns

The eagles from temperate regions migrate southwards for wintering. The population in Southeast Asia is sedentary. The eagle populations in Europe and temperate Asia, winter in North Africa and Indian Subcontinent.

Status and conservation

The short-toed snake eagle global population size is estimated to be between 51,400 to 156,000 individual birds. Considering the extremely large range, these eagle species are least vulnerable. Habitat loss and agricultural activities are the current threats to the survival of these species.

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated these eagle species and has listed them as of "Least Concern".

Biological classification of Circaetus gallicus
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Accipitriformes
Family:Accipitridae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Circaetus
Species:C. gallicus
Binomial name:Circaetus gallicus
Distribution:Southeast Asia, Indian Subcontinent, Asia, Europe and Africa;
Feeding habits:mainly snakes and lizards, also small mammals and birds;
IUCN status listing:
Least Concern

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Saturday, June 20

Red-headed vulture

   ›      ›   Red-headed vulture - Sarcogyps calvus.

The red-headed vulture (Sarcogyps calvus) belongs to the family Accipitridae.

These red-headed vulture species are distributed in Southeast Asia and Indian Subcontinent.

Taxonomy of Red-headed vulture

  • Scientific Name: Sarcogyps calvus
  • Common Name: Red-headed vulture
  • French: Vautour royal; German: Kahlkopfgeier; Spanish: Buitre cabecirrojo;
  • Other names: Vultur calvus Scopoli, 1786; Asian king vulture; Indian black vulture; Pondicherry vulture;
  • Family: Accipitridae › Accipitriformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia

    Species author: (Scopoli, 1786)
Sarcogyps calvus was earlier included in genus Vultur.

Description

The red-headed vulture is a large bird, measuring 75 to 85 cm in length and weighing 3,500 to 5,500 grams. The wingspan is 200 to 230 cm. It is mainly black except for bare reddish head, neck and legs. It has a pale grey band at the base of the flight feathers. The male bird has a paler, whitish iris, while the female has dark brown iris.

Indian birds - Image of Red-headed vulture - Sarcogyps calvus
Indian birds - Image of Red-headed vulture - Sarcogyps calvus

Habitat

The red-headed vulture prefers open country usually away from human habitation, well-wooded hills and dry deciduous forest with rivers.

Feeding habits

The red-headed vulture species feed on carcasses of medium sized and large mammals. They may occasionally snatch feed from other birds. They soar high on the thermals to locate dead animals.

Breeding

The breeding season of these bird species is between December and September. Nesting has been recorded in tall trees.

Distribution

These red headed vulture species are distributed in India, Nepal, Bangladesh and Bhutan in Indian Subcontinent. Small populations are present in Myanmar, Laos and Cambodia. It was previously present in South China, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia and Singapore.

Movement Patterns

These bird species are mainly sedentary. The population in the Nepal is found to perform seasonal altitudinal movements.

Status and conservation

The red-headed vulture global population is estimated to number 3,500 to 15,000 individual birds. The Indian vulture population declined by 90% mainly due to toxicity from diclofenac present in carcasses of cattle. The drastic reduction in the wild ungulate population, reduced availability of feed and increased human activity in the habitat are the threats for their survival.

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated these bird species and has listed them as "Critically Endangered".

Biological classification of Sarcogyps calvus
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Accipitriformes
Family:Accipitridae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Sarcogyps
Species:S. calvus
Binomial name:Sarcogyps calvus
Distribution:Southeast Asia and Indian Subcontinent;
Feeding habits:mainly carrion, also snatches food from other birds;
IUCN status listing:
Critically Endangered

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Wednesday, June 17

Cinereous vulture

   ›      ›   Cinereous vulture - Aegypius monachus.

The cinereous vulture (Aegypius monachus) belongs to the family Accipitridae. These cinereous vulture species are distributed in Europe, Asia and Indian Subcontinent.

Taxonomy of Cinereous vulture

  • Scientific Name: Aegypius monachus
  • Common Name: Cinereous vulture
  • French: Vautour moine; German: Mönchsgeier; Spanish: Buitre negro;
  • Other names: Vultur Monachus Linnaeus, 1766; black vulture; monk vulture; Eurasian black vulture;
  • Family: Accipitridae › Accipitriformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • Species author: (Linnaeus, 1766)
Aegypius monachus was earlier included in genus vultur.

Indian birds - Image of Cinereous vulture - Aegypius monachus
Indian birds - Image of Cinereous vulture - Aegypius monachus

Description

The cinereous vulture is a large bird, measuring 100 to 110 cm in length and weighing 7,000 to 12,500 grams. The wingspan is 250 to 300 cm. The whole body is dark brown, except the head covered with brown down. The bare skin in the head and neck is bluish grey. The adult has brown eyes and a purplish cere. The bill is massive and is blue-gray in color. The legs are pale blue-gray. Their sounds and calls include grunts, croaks and hisses when feeding at carcasses.

Habitat

The cinereous vultures inhabit hilly, mountainous areas, dry semi-open habitats such as meadows at high altitudes, steppe, grasslands and open woodlands.

Feeding habits

These cinereous vulture species feed on carcasses of medium sized and large mammals. They may occasionally takes live prey. They soar high on the thermals to locate dead animals.

Breeding

These cinereous vulture species breed during February and March. They breed in loose colonies in trees and cliff ledges. The nest is built with sticks and twigs. The egg clutch typically only a single egg. Both the parents take part in the rearing of the chick.

Distribution

The cinereous vulture is distributed in France, Spain, Bulgaria, Greece, Turkey, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Ukraine, Russia, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Kyrgyzstan, Saudi Arabia, Middle East, Iran, Afghanistan, north India, northern Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Myanmar, Laos, Mongolia, China, North Korea and South Korea.

Movement Patterns

The adult cinereous vulture populations in the Europe are mostly sedentary. The populations in temperate Asia migrate southwards for wintering.

Status and conservation

The cinereous vulture global population is estimated to number 21,000 to 30,000 individual birds. There is slight increase in European population. There is decline in the Asian population. Shooting, poisoning, use of veterinary diclofenac (anti-inflammatory drug), decrease in food availability and habitat loss are the main threats in the conservation of these species.

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated these vulture species and has listed them as "Near Threatened".

Biological classification of Aegypius monachus
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Accipitriformes
Family:Accipitridae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Aegypius
Species:A. monachus
Binomial name:Aegypius monachus
Distribution:Europe, Asia and Indian Subcontinent;
Feeding habits:mainly carrion, rarely feeds on live prey;
IUCN status listing:
Near Threatened

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Tuesday, June 16

Griffon vulture

   ›      ›   Griffon vulture - Gyps fulvus.

The griffon vulture (Gyps fulvus) belongs to the family Accipitridae. These griffon vulture species are distributed in Europe, central Asia, Africa and Indian Subcontinent.

Taxonomy of Griffon vulture

  • Scientific Name: Gyps fulvus
  • Common Name: Griffon vulture
  • French: Vautour fauve; German: Gänsegeier; Spanish: Buitre leonado;
  • Other names: Vultur fulvus Hablizl, 1783; Eurasian griffon;
  • Family: Accipitridae › Accipitriformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • Species author: (Hablizl, 1783)
Gyps fulvus was earlier included in genus vultur. It is closely related to G. himalayensis and G. coprotheres. The two recognized subspecies are: G. f. fulvus (Hablizl, 1783) and G. f. fulvescens A. O. Hume, 1869.

Indian birds - Image of Griffon vulture - Gyps fulvus
Indian birds - Image of Griffon vulture - Gyps fulvus

Description

The griffon vulture is a large bird, measuring 95 to 110 cm in length and weighing 6,000 to 11,000 grams. The wingspan is 240 to 280 cm. Its head and neck are white. The wings are broad and the tail is short. The buff body and wing coverts contrast with the dark flight feathers. They are noisy while feeding, making various grunting and hissing sounds and calls.

Habitat

The griffon vultures are adapted to wide range of habitats including open country, mountains, plateaux, steppe and semi deserts.

Feeding habits

These vulture species feed on carcasses, typically feeding on muscles and viscera of medium sized and large mammals. They soar high on the thermals to locate dead animals.

Breeding

These vulture species breed during December and March. They nest on rocky outcrop, with sheltered ledges or small caves and cliffs. The clutch is found to have one egg. Both the parents take part in rearing the chick.

Distribution

The griffon vulture subspecies G. f. fulvus is distributed in northwest Africa, Europe, Mediterranean region, Turkey, Middle East, Arabia, Iran and Kazakhstan. The subspecies G. f. fulvescens is distributed in Afghanistan, Pakistan and north and northeast India.

Movement Patterns

These vulture species are mostly sedentary. The juveniles and immature vultures may migrate far and make long-distance movements.

Status and conservation

The griffon vulture global range is large and the population is least vulnerable. Threats to conservation of these species include habitat degradation, human activities, wind farms, reduced food availability and a shortage of suitable nesting sites.

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated these vulture species and has listed them as "Least Concern".

Biological classification of Gyps fulvus
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Accipitriformes
Family:Accipitridae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Gyps
Species:G. fulvus
Binomial name:Gyps fulvus
Distribution:Europe, central Asia, Africa and Indian Subcontinent;
Feeding habits:mainly carrion;
IUCN status listing:
Least Concern

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Monday, June 15

Himalayan vulture

   ›      ›   Himalayan vulture - Gyps himalayensis.

The Himalayan vulture (Gyps himalayensis) belongs to the family Accipitridae.

These Himalayan vulture species are distributed in India, Nepal, Pakistan, Bhutan and China.

Taxonomy of Himalayan vulture

  • Scientific Name: Gyps himalayensis
  • Common Name: Himalayan vulture
  • French: Vautour de l’Himalaya; German: Schneegeier; Spanish: Buitre del Himalaya;
  • Other names: Himalayan Griffon;
  • Family: Accipitridae › Accipitriformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • Species author: Hume, 1869
Gyps himalayensis is closely related to European griffon vulture (G. fulvus).

Description

The Himalayan vulture is a large bird, measuring 100 to 110 cm in length and weighing 8,000 to 12,000 grams. The wingspan is 260 to 290 cm. Adult birds have long and pale brown ruff with white streaks. The head is covered in down which is yellowish in adults but whitish in immature birds. The underside and under-wing coverts vary, from being pale brown to almost white in some birds. The legs are greenish-grey to white. The facial skin is pale whitish blue. They are noisy while feeding making various grunting and hissing sounds and calls.

Indian birds - Image of Himalayan vulture - Gyps himalayensis
Indian birds - Image of Himalayan vulture - Gyps himalayensis

Habitat

These vulture species inhabit mountains, high-elevation steppes and plateaus.

Feeding habits

These vulture species feed on carcasses, typically avoiding offal and eating only flesh. They have been observed feeding on pine needles, an unexplained behaviour.

Breeding

The Himalayan vulture breeding season is from January to March. The nest is built on a cliff. The clutch usually has one egg. Both the parents participate in rearing the chick.

Distribution

These vulture species are distributed in Himalayan Pakistan, India, Tibet, Nepal and Bhutan. It also occurs in Central and western China, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Afghanistan and Mongolia. This vulture species is a rare winter visitor to Thailand, Cambodia and Bangladesh.

Movement Patterns

These vulture species are mostly sedentary. They may move to lower altitudes in winter. The juvenile birds may disperse south during winter.

Status and conservation

The Himalayan vulture global population is now estimated to be 100,000 to 500,000 individual birds. There is a steady decline in the population of these bird species and they are considered 'Near Threatened'. Kidney failure in vultures caused by feeding on carcasses of animals treated with diclofenac (a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) was the major cause of decline in populations. Threats to conservation of these species include habitat degradation, human activities, reduced food availability and a shortage of suitable nesting sites.

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated these vulture species and has listed them as "Near Threatened".

Biological classification of Gyps himalayensis
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Accipitriformes
Family:Accipitridae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Gyps
Species:G. himalayensis
Binomial name:Gyps himalayensis
Distribution:Himalayan India, Pakistan, Nepal, Tibet, Bhutan and Central China;
Feeding habits:mainly carrion;
IUCN status listing:
Near Threatened

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Saturday, June 13

Slender-billed vulture

   ›      ›   Slender-billed vulture - Gyps tenuirostris.

The slender-billed vulture (Gyps tenuirostris) belongs to the family Accipitridae. These slender-billed vulture species are distributed in India, Nepal, Myanmar, Laos and Cambodia.

Taxonomy of Slender-billed vulture

  • Scientific Name: Gyps tenuirostris
  • Common Name: Slender-billed vulture
  • French: Vautour à long bec; German: Dünnschnabelgeier; Spanish: Buitre picofino;
  • Other names: Gyps indicus tenuirostris; Gyps indicus nudiceps;
  • Family: Accipitridae › Accipitriformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • Species author: G. R. Gray, 1844
Gyps tenuirostris was earlier considered conspecific with G. indicus.

Indian birds - Slender-billed vulture - Gyps tenuirostris
Indian birds - Slender-billed vulture - Gyps tenuirostris

Description

The slender-billed vulture is medium sized vulture, measuring 80 to 100 cm in length. The wingspan is 190 to 260 cm. It has a long neck. The head and neck are black and lack feathers. The neck skin is thickly creased and wrinkled. The bill is dark with pale culmen and black cere. The thin long bill and snake-like long neck are its distinguishing characters.

Habitat

The slender-billed vulture inhabits dry open country, partly wooded country and forested areas usually away from human habitation.

Feeding habits

These bird species are scavengers, feeding mostly from carcasses of dead animals. They also scavenge at rubbish dumps and slaughterhouses.

Breeding

The slender-billed vulture is recorded to nest in tall trees. The nest is built with sticks.

Distribution

These vulture species are distributed in India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar. They had also occurred in Malaysia and Thailand.

Movement Patterns

The slender-billed vulture is sedentary in its range and make movements in search of feed.

Status and conservation

The slender-billed vulture global population is now estimated to be 1,000 individual birds. There is a sharp decline in the population of these bird species and they are considered 'critically endangered'. Kidney failure in vultures caused by feeding on carcasses of animals treated with diclofenac (a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) was the major cause of sudden decline in populations. There is 97% decline in population. These species are nearing extinction.

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated these vulture species and has listed them as "Critically Endangered".

Biological classification of Gyps tenuirostris
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Accipitriformes
Family:Accipitridae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Gyps
Species:G. tenuirostris
Binomial name:Gyps tenuirostris
Distribution:Lower Himalayas in India, Nepal, Myanmar, Laos and Cambodia;
Feeding habits:mainly carrion;
IUCN status listing:
Critically Endangered

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Image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Gyps_tenuirostris.png
Image Author: W. T. Blanford | Image License: Public domain
Current topic in Birds of India: Slender-billed vulture - Gyps tenuirostris.
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