Saturday, April 15

Indian courser

   ›      ›   Indian courser - Cursorius coromandelicus

The Indian courser (Cursorius coromandelicus) is a ground bird, belonging to the family of pratincoles and coursers, Glareolidae.

The Indian courser species are distributed in the Indian subcontinent. These courser species hunt insects by running and picking. These coursers are monotypic species.

Overview & Quick Facts Description & Identification
Pictures of Indian Courser Distribution & Range
Ecosystem & Habitat Diet & Feeding Behavior
Breeding Habits Migration & Movement Patterns
Conservation & Survival IUCN Status
Taxonomy & Classification Bird World

Indian courser - Overview

  • Scientific name: Cursorius coromandelicus
  • Species author: (Gmelin, 1789)
  • Synonyms/Protonym: Charadrius coromandelicus J. F. Gmelin, 1789
  • Family: Glareolidae › Charadriiformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • Vernacular names: English: Indian courser, Chinese: 印度走鸻, French: Courvite de Coromandel, German: Koromandelrennvogel, Spanish: Corredor indio, Russian: Коромандельский бегунок, Japanese: インドスナバシリ, Tamil: Kal Kuruvi
  • Other names: Indian Courser
  • Distribution: Indian subcontinent
  • Diet and feeding habits: termites, ants, beetles, crickets, mole crickets, grasshoppers
  • IUCN status listing: Least Concern (LC)
The Indian courser (Cursorius coromandelicus) is closely related to cream-coloured courser (Cursorius cursor), Somali courser (Cursorius somalensis), Burchell's courser (Cursorius rufus) and Temminck's courser (Cursorius temminckii).

Appearance, physical description and identification

The Indian courser (Cursorius coromandelicus) is a medium-sized courser, measuring 20 to 25 cm in length. The wingspan is 55 to 60 cm.

The upperparts are grayish brown. The uppertail is white. The crown is dark bright rufous. It is bordered below by the white supercilia meeting in V on the nape. Just above the meeting point of supercilia, there is a black patch.

A broad, black eye-stripe begins at the base of the bill and passes through the eyes. The chin and lower cheeks are cream colored. The throat and the upper breast are pale rufous. The lower breast is deep rufous.

The black beak is slightly curved downwards. The irises are black. The long legs are whitish and shiny. Both the sexes appear similar. Their call is a hoarse, creaky “gwaat” sound.
Indian courser - Cursorius coromandelicus
Indian courser - Cursorius coromandelicus picture by Manojiritty

Indian courser - Cursorius coromandelicus
Indian courser - Cursorius coromandelicus photo by Supreet Sahoo

Indian courser - Cursorius coromandelicus
Indian courser - Cursorius coromandelicus image by Ashokkumar S T

Origin, geographical range and distribution

The Indian courser species are distributed in the Indian subcontinent. Their distribution includes Pakistan, Nepal and Sri Lanka. There are no recent records of their occurrence in Bangladesh.

They are distributed in the states of Maharashtra, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Himachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, West Bengal, Punjab, Haryana, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, Gujarat, Telangana, Andhra Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand and West Bengal.

Ecosystem and habitat

These courser species do not normally occur in forest. These species occur in altitudes from 0 to 100 meters.

The artificial ecosystem of these species includes agricultural lands, fallow land with scattered scrubs, ploughed fields and pasturelands. The natural ecosystems of these species includes tropical and subtropical dry grasslands, rocky terrain, dry plains with scattered scrubs.

Diet and feeding behavior

The diet of these courser species is mostly insects. Insects and their larvae, molluscs, spiders, termites, ants, beetles, crickets, mole crickets, grasshoppers, plant seeds and grains are their primary food. They search for prey as they run and stop to pick the prey.

Reproduction and breeding habits

The breeding season of these courser species from March to August in India. The laying season is during May and June in Sri Lanka. The nest is a scrape on the bare ground. The typical clutch contains two or three speckled, spherical eggs.

The hatchlings have well-camouflaged cryptic coloration and patterns and on alarm crouch and remain immobile. The chicks have down feathers and are able move with the parents upon hatching. Initially they are fed by the parents and after a week they begin to forage on their own.

Migration and movement patterns

These courser species are non-migratory resident birds.

Post breeding, juveniles may disperse and establish in new locations within the range. They may make local nomadic movements for feeding and breeding within their range.

Conservation and survival

The global population size of the Indian courser (Cursorius coromandelicus) has not been quantified. The overall population trend of these species is considered to be stable. Throughout its range it is reported to be fairly common. The generation length is 7.3 years. Their distribution size is about 3,570,000 sq.km.

The Indian courser (Cursorius coromandelicus) does not approach the thresholds for being Vulnerable, either under the range size criterion, or under the population trend criterion or under the population size criterion. Agricultural expansion and habitat fragmentation are the main threats that may endanger the survival of these species.

IUCN and CITES status

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated the species and has listed it as of "Least Concern". The CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) status is ‘Not Evaluated’ for the Indian courser (Cursorius coromandelicus).
Taxonomy and scientific classification of Cursorius coromandelicus
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Charadriiformes
Family:Glareolidae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Cursorius
Species:C. coromandelicus
Binomial name:Cursorius coromandelicus
IUCN status listing:
Least Concern
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1.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Indian_courser.jpg (cropped)
Image author: Manojiritty | License: CC BY-SA 4.0
2.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Indian_Courser,_Rollapadu.jpg (cropped)
Image author: Supreet Sahoo | License: CC BY-SA 4.0
3.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Indian_courser_juvenil.jpg (cropped)
Image author: Ashokkumar S T | License: CC BY-SA 4.0
Current topic: Indian courser - Cursorius coromandelicus.
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Friday, April 14

Eurasian woodcock photos

   ›      ›   Eurasian woodcock (Scolopax rusticola) photos
Taxonomic classification   Photos
The Eurasian woodcock (Scolopax rusticola) belongs to the family Scolopacidae under the order Charadriiformes.

The genus Scolopax comprises of eight extant species and five fossil species of wading birds. As the name implies the woodcocks are species of woodlands. Their preferred habitat is moist forests with humus accumulation, a good source of their favorite food, the earthworms.

The Scolopax spp. are birds with stocky bodies. They have cryptic rufus, brown and black plumage with intricate patterns, providing camouflage to suit their woodland habitat. They have a slender, long and straight bill. The tip of the upper mandible is flexible.

The eyes are located on the sides of the head. Apart from giving them 360° vision, the location of the eyes provides them better focus while searching for invertebrates in soft ground with their long bills and also protects eyes getting smeared with mud and slush.
Taxonomic classification
Binomial name:Scolopax rusticola
Species:S. rusticola
Genus:Scolopax
Subfamily:-
Family:Scolopacidae
Order:Charadriiformes
Class:Aves
Phylum:Chordata
Kingdom:Animalia
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Photos
Eurasian woodcock - Scolopax rusticola
1.Photo by Jason Thompson

Eurasian woodcock - Scolopax rusticola
2.Photo by JJ Harrison

Eurasian Scolopax rusticola
3.Photo by Ronald Slabke

Eurasian woodcock - Scolopax rusticola
4.by Jason Thompson

Eurasian woodcock - Scolopax rusticola
5.by N p holmes

Eurasian woodcock - Scolopax rusticola
6.by Chun-Chieh Liao

Eurasian woodcock - Scolopax rusticola
7.Picture by Chun-Chieh Liao

Eurasian woodcock - Scolopax rusticola
8.Image by Patty McGann

Scolopax rusticola
9.Photo by Dave Curtis

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1.Photo source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Eurasian_Woodcock.jpg (cropped)
Author: Jason Thompson | License: CC BY 2.0 as on 4/14/17
2.Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Scolopax_rusticola_-_Doi_Inthanon.jpg (cropped)
Author: JJ Harrison (jjharrison89@facebook.com) | License: CC BY-SA 3.0
3.Photo source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Woodcock_earthworm.jpg (cropped)
Author: Ronald Slabke | License: CC BY-SA 3.0
4.Photo source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/79492850@N00/8509619194/in/photostream/ (cropped)
Author: Jason Thompson | License: CC BY 2.0 as on 4/14/17
5.Photo source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Injured_Woodcock.jpg (cropped)
Author: N p holmes | License: CC BY-SA 3.0
6.Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/flamecrest/27010594190/ (cropped)
Author: Chun-Chieh Liao | License: CC BY-NC 2.0 as on 4/14/17
7.Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/flamecrest/27285925065/ (cropped)
Author: Chun-Chieh Liao | License: CC BY-NC 2.0 as on 4/14/17
8.Photo source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pattymc/7059417631/ (cropped)
Author: Patty McGann | License: CC BY-NC 2.0 as on 4/14/17
9.Photo source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/davethebird/16812929320/
Author: Dave Curtis | License: CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 as on 4/14/17
Current topic in Birds of India: Eurasian woodcock (Scolopax rusticola) photos.
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Thursday, April 13

Eurasian woodcock

   ›      ›   Eurasian woodcock - Scolopax rusticola

The Eurasian woodcock (Scolopax rusticola) is a medium-sized wading bird, belonging to the family of sandpipers, curlews and woodcocks, Scolopacidae.

The Eurasian woodcock species are distributed in Indian subcontinent, Europe, Central Asia, southeast Asia and northern Africa. These woodcock species are susceptible to avian influenza. These woodcocks are monotypic species.

Overview & Quick Facts Description & Identification
Pictures of Eurasian Woodcock Distribution & Range
Ecosystem & Habitat Diet & Feeding Behavior
Breeding Habits Migration & Movement Patterns
Conservation & Survival IUCN Status
Taxonomy & Classification Bird World

Eurasian woodcock - Overview

  • Scientific name: Scolopax rusticola
  • Species author: Linnaeus, 1758
  • Synonyms/Protonym: Scolopax Rusticola Linnaeus, 1758
  • Family: Scolopacidae › Charadriiformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • Vernacular names: English: Eurasian woodcock, Chinese: 丘鹬, French: Bécasse des bois, German: Waldschnepfe, Spanish: Chocha perdiz, Russian: Вальдшнеп, Japanese: ヤマシギ, Malay: Berkek Besar, Tamil: Malai Mookkan
  • Other names: European Woodcock
  • Distribution: Europe, Asia and north Africa
  • Diet and feeding habits: insects, earthworm, larvae
  • IUCN status listing: Least Concern (LC)
The Eurasian woodcock (Scolopax rusticola) is closely related to Amami woodcock (Scolopax mira).

Appearance, physical description and identification

The Eurasian woodcock (Scolopax rusticola) is a medium-sized woodcock, measuring 30 to 35 cm in length and weighing 130 to 420 grams. The wingspan is 55 to 60 cm.

The upperparts of the Eurasian woodcock are intricately patterned reddish-brown. The underparts are buff-brown. The crown region has thick dark brown bars. The eyes are located high on the sides of its head. The bill is long and straight. The bill is flesh colored at the base and blackish at the tip. Their call is a loud, "orr, orr, orr" sound.
Indian birds - Picture of Eurasian woodcock - Scolopax rusticola
Birds of India - Image of Eurasian woodcock - Scolopax rusticola by Ronald Slabke

Birds of India - Photo of Eurasian woodcock - Scolopax rusticola
Indian birds - Picture of Eurasian woodcock - Scolopax rusticola by Jason Thompson

Indian birds - Image of Eurasian woodcock - Scolopax rusticola
Birds of India - Photo of Eurasian woodcock - Scolopax rusticola by JJ Harrison

Origin, geographical range and distribution

The Eurasian woodcock species are distributed in Indian subcontinent, Europe, Central Asia, southeast Asia and northern Africa.

In India, the wintering birds are distributed in Maharashtra, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, West Bengal, Sikkim, Assam, Meghalaya, Arunachal Pradesh, Nagaland, Manipur, Tripura and Mizoram.

Ecosystem and habitat

These Eurasian woodcock species have moderate forest dependency. These species occur in altitudes from 0 to 2500 meters.

The artificial ecosystem of these Eurasian woodcock species includes cultivated land and plantations. The natural ecosystems of these woodcock species includes boreal forests, temperate forests, shrublands and tropical and subtropical moist forests.

Diet and feeding behavior

The diet of these Eurasian woodcock species is mostly earthworms. Insects and their larvae, freshwater molluscs, spiders, slugs, leaches, ribbon worms, plant seeds, grains, fruits, grass roots and leaves are their primary food. They probe the ground with their long sensitive bill to find food.

Reproduction and breeding habits

The breeding season of the Eurasian woodcock species starts from March in much of its breeding range. The male birds performs courtship display flights at dusk. They prefer the nesting sites containing dense undergrowth and ground cover.

The nest is a shallow cup like depression in the ground lined with dead leaves and other plant material. The typical clutch of the Eurasian woodcock contains four white or creamy eggs with light brown and gray spotting.

The female incubates the eggs for about 24 days. The hatchlings have downy feathers. The chicks are precocial and leave the nest immediately, following the mother. They fledge after 15–20 days. It is believed that the mother woodcock can fly carrying the chicks between her legs, body and tail when threatened.

Migration and movement patterns

The Eurasian woodcock species are partially migratory birds.

The Eurasian woodcock populations in northern Europe, northern Russia, northern Mongolia, northwest China and north Japan are migratory and migrate to southern Europe, the Indian Subcontinent, Southeast Asia or northern Africa for wintering. They leave the breeding grounds on the approach of winter and return back in early summer.

The Eurasian woodcock populations in western European countries and in Atlantic islands off the northwest African coast are sedentary and resident. The birds residing in Himalayas make altitudinal migration, moving to foothills during the winter.

Conservation and survival

The global population size of the Eurasian woodcock (Scolopax rusticola) is estimated to be around 10,000,000 to 26,000,000 individual birds. The overall population trend of these woodcock species is considered to be stable. Throughout its range it is reported to be common to very common. The generation length is 6.3 years. Their distribution size is about 49,000,000 sq.km.

The Eurasian woodcock (Scolopax rusticola) does not approach the thresholds for being Vulnerable, either under the range size criterion, or under the population trend criterion or under the population size criterion. Agricultural expansion, habitat fragmentation, loss of soil fauna due to use of agricultural chemicals, susceptibility to avian influenza and hunting pressure are the main threats that may endanger the survival of these woodcock species.

IUCN and CITES status

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated the woodcock species and has listed it as of "Least Concern". The CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) status is ‘Not Evaluated’ for the Eurasian woodcock (Scolopax rusticola).
Taxonomy and scientific classification of Scolopax rusticola
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Charadriiformes
Family:Scolopacidae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Scolopax
Species:S. rusticola
Binomial name:Scolopax rusticola
IUCN status listing:
Least Concern
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1.Image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Woodcock_earthworm.jpg (cropped)
Image author: Ronald Slabke | License: CC BY-SA 3.0
2.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Eurasian_Woodcock.jpg (cropped)
Image author: Jason Thompson | License: CC BY 2.0 as on 4/13/17
3.Image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Scolopax_rusticola_-_Doi_Inthanon.jpg (cropped)
Image author: JJ Harrison (jjharrison89@facebook.com) | License: CC BY-SA 3.0
Current topic in Birds of India: Eurasian woodcock - Scolopax rusticola.
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Wednesday, April 12

Austen's brown hornbill photos

   ›      ›   Austen's brown hornbill (Anorrhinus austeni) photos

The Austen's brown hornbill (Anorrhinus austeni) belongs to the family Bucerotidae under the order Bucerotiformes.

The Anorrhinus spp. are found in Southeast Asia and the adjacent parts of India and China. These species have evolved a social system of cooperative breeding. The adult offsprings stay in the natal territory, helping their parents to nest, defend and feed their younger siblings.

The parent birds tolerate the grown offsprings in their territory. The young adults sacrifice their breeding opportunities, to contribute for the parental reproductive success and parental survival.

The freshly moulted female and young hatchlings are under the risk of starvation death when the male is killed, disabled or incapacitated. However when there are helpers the feed-supply goes on till the chicks fledge.


Research studies have revealed that nests without helper-birds fail quite often. The nest with helpers are highly successful and there is increase in the number of chicks fledged. Greater number of helpers resulted in large successful broods. The time taken by the chick to fledge is also gets reduced.
Austen's brown hornbill - Anorrhinus austeni
1.Photo by lonelyshrimp

Austen's brown hornbill - Anorrhinus austeni
2.Photo by Pkspks

Austen's Anorrhinus austeni
3.Photo by Rohit Naniwadekar

Photo of Anorrhinus austeni
4.Photo by Pkspks

Austen's Anorrhinus austeni
5.Photo by Pkspks

Photo of Austen's brown hornbill - Anorrhinus austeni
6.Austen's brown hornbill - Anorrhinus austeni

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1.Photo source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/lonelyshrimp/33402561731/in/pool-backyardbirds/ (cropped)
Author: lonelyshrimp | License: CC0 1.0 (public domain) as on 4/12/17
2.Photo source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Austen%27s_Brown_Hornbill.jpg (cropped)
Author: Pkspks | License: CC BY-SA 4.0
3.Photo source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:White_throated_Brown_Hornbill.jpg (cropped)
Author: Rohit Naniwadekar | License: CC BY-SA 3.0
4.Photo source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Austen%27s_Brown_Hornbill.jpg (cropped)
Author: Pkspks | License: CC BY-SA 4.0
5.Photo source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Austen%27s_Brown_Hornbill.jpg (cropped)
Author: Pkspks | License: CC BY-SA 4.0
Current topic in Birds of India: Austen's brown hornbill (Anorrhinus austeni) photos.
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Tuesday, April 11

Austen's brown hornbill

   ›      ›   Austen's brown hornbill - Anorrhinus austeni

The Austen's brown hornbill (Anorrhinus austeni) is a medium-sized hornbill, belonging to the family Bucerotidae.

The Austen's brown hornbill species are distributed in India, China, Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam. These hornbills are monotypic species. The name 'Austen's brown hornbill' commemorates Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Haversham Godwin-Austen, an English topographer, geologist, naturalist and surveyor.

Overview & Quick Facts Description & Identification
Pictures of Austen's Brown Hornbill Distribution & Range
Ecosystem & Habitat Diet & Feeding Behavior
Breeding Habits Migration & Movement Patterns
Conservation & Survival IUCN Status
Taxonomy & Classification Bird World

Austen's brown hornbill - Overview

  • Scientific name: Anorrhinus austeni
  • Species author: Jerdon, 1872
  • Synonyms/Protonym: Anorhinus austeni Jerdon, 1872,
  • Family: Bucerotidae › Bucerotiformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • Vernacular names: English: Austen's brown hornbill, Chinese: 白喉犀鸟, French: Calao d’Austen, German: Weißgesicht-Hornvogel, Spanish: Cálao pardo de Austen, Russian: Коричневая птица-носорог, Japanese: アッサムサイチョウ, Vietnamese: Chim Niệc nâu
  • Other names: Godwin Austen’s Brown Hornbill
  • Distribution: China, India, Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam
  • Diet and feeding habits: fruits, berries, figs, large insects, lizards, bats, snakes, snails, earthworms
  • IUCN status listing: Near Threatened (NT)
The Austen's brown hornbill (Anorrhinus austeni) is closely related to Tickell's brown hornbill (Anorrhinus tickelli) and Bushy-crested hornbill (Anorrhinus galeritus).

Appearance, physical description and identification

The Austen's brown hornbill (Anorrhinus austeni) is a medium-sized hornbill, measuring 60 to 65 cm in length.

The overall plumage is brownish. The male has white cheeks and throat. The bill is pale yellow in color. The underparts are rufous-brownish. The tail is tipped white. The feet are gray. The irises are blackish. Their call is a loud, plaintive screaming sound.
Indian birds - Picture of Austen's brown hornbill - Anorrhinus austeni
Birds of India - Image of Austen's brown hornbill - Anorrhinus austeni by lonelyshrimp

Birds of India - Photo of Austen's brown hornbill - Anorrhinus austeni
Indian birds - Picture of Austen's brown hornbill - Anorrhinus austeni by Rohit Naniwadekar

Indian birds - Image of Austen's brown hornbill - Anorrhinus austeni
Birds of India - Photo of Austen's brown hornbill - Anorrhinus austeni by Pkspks

Origin, geographical range and distribution

The Austen's brown hornbill species are distributed in northeast India, south China (Yunnan), east and north Myanmar, north Thailand, west Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam. In India, these species are distributed in Assam, Nagaland and Manipur.

The Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBA) of these species in Laos are Upper Xe Kaman, Phou Dendin, Dong Ampham, Nam Xam, Eastern Bolikhamxay Mountains, Nakai-Nam Theun, Nakai Plateau and Hin Namno. The IBA of these species in Cambodia is Kirirom and in Vietnam is Kon Cha Rang.

Ecosystem and habitat

These Austen's brown hornbill species have high forest dependency. These species occur in altitudes from 0 to 1800 meters.

The natural ecosystems of these hornbill species includes tropical and subtropical moist lowland forests, evergreen forests, deciduous forests, lowland plains, tropical and subtropical montane forests and pine and oak montane forests.

Diet and feeding behavior

The diet of these Austen's brown hornbill species is mostly fruits. Wild fruits, berries, figs, large insects, lizards, bats, snakes, snails, earthworms and eggs and chicks of birds are their primary food. The swallowed food is regurgitated and brought to the tip of the bill and passed on to the female and chicks.

Reproduction and breeding habits

The breeding season of the Austen's brown hornbill is during March to June in India. The laying season is during February and March in Thailand. These species live in groups and only the dominant pair breeds while the other members of the group act as helpers. They nest in natural tree cavities and abandoned woodpecker holes.

Research studies have indicated that the assistance by helpers-hornbills steadily increased the food-delivery rates during the breeding cycle. The assistance from helpers, eventually increased the success of breeding and reduced the time required for the chicks to fledge.

Migration and movement patterns

The Austen's brown hornbill species are non-migratory resident birds. The groups living in higher altitudes may move to lower levels during winter.

Post breeding, juvenile hornbills may disperse and establish in new locations within the range. They may make local movements for feeding and breeding within their range.

Conservation and survival

The global population size of the Austen's brown hornbill (Anorrhinus austeni) has not been quantified. The overall population trend of these species is considered to be decreasing. Throughout its range it is reported to be locally common to rare. The generation length is 11.1 years. Their distribution size is about 1,650,000 sq.km.

The Austen's brown hornbill (Anorrhinus austeni) is approaching the thresholds for being Vulnerable, under the range size criterion, under the population trend criterion and also under the population size criterion. Agricultural expansion, logging activities, road building, habitat degradation and destruction, hunting pressure and trapping for pet trade are the main threats that may endanger the survival of these hornbill species.

IUCN and CITES status

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated the hornbill species and has listed it as "Near Threatened". The CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) status is ‘Evaluated’ for the Austen's brown hornbill (Anorrhinus austeni) and is listed in Appendix II.
Taxonomy and scientific classification of Anorrhinus austeni
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Bucerotiformes
Family:Bucerotidae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Anorrhinus
Species:A. austeni
Binomial name:Anorrhinus austeni
IUCN status listing:
Near Threatened
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1.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/lonelyshrimp/33402561731/in/pool-backyardbirds/ (cropped)
Image author: lonelyshrimp | License: CC0 1.0 (public domain) as on4/11/17
2.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:White_throated_Brown_Hornbill.jpg (cropped)
Image author: Rohit Naniwadekar | License: CC BY-SA 3.0
3.Image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Austen%27s_Brown_Hornbill.jpg (cropped)
Image author: Pkspks | License: CC BY-SA 4.0
Current topic in Birds of India: Austen's brown hornbill - Anorrhinus austeni.
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