Friday, May 19

Pheasant-tailed jacana photos

   ›      ›   Pheasant-tailed jacana (Hydrophasianus chirurgus) photos
Taxonomic classification   <>   Photos
The pheasant-tailed jacana (Hydrophasianus chirurgus) belongs to the family Jacanidae under the order Charadriiformes.

Parental care in Hydrophasianus chirurgus

The species under the family Jacanidae are a group of waders adapted for life on floating and emergent vegetation. They have long feets and toes which enable them to walk on floating vegetation.

The long toes splay nearly 15 cm across in the case of H. chirurgus. This spreads the weight of the bird over greater surface area and prevents the vegetation giving way beneath it.

The males take up the responsibility of incubating the eggs. The species Hydrophasianus chirurgus are polyandrous. The pheasant-tailed jacana female builds a flimsy nest, lays four eggs and leaves it for the current mate to incubate.

After a few days the same female pairs up with another male and lays another clutch for the second male to incubate. In a breeding season these birds are known to lay even up to ten clutches. The female does not take part in incubation and raising of the young.

The male appears to be neglectful in the first ten days of incubation and nearly half of pheasant-tailed jacana nests are lost before the chick hatch out. The male birds have been observed to throw out some eggs from their nest for unknown reasons.

However, in the last week of incubation the male appears to be more responsible with incubation. Once the chicks hatch out the male becomes a better father. When threatened it may scoop the chicks under the wing and run for safety. Sometimes the male leads the chicks away from the danger.
Taxonomic classification
Binomial name:Hydrophasianus chirurgus
Species:H. chirurgus
Genus:Hydrophasianus
Subfamily:-
Family:Jacanidae
Order:Charadriiformes
Class:Aves
Phylum:Chordata
Kingdom:Animalia
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Photos
Pheasant-tailed jacana - Hydrophasianus chirurgus
1.Pheasant-tailed jacana - Hydrophasianus chirurgus
Photo by Ramjeesk

Pheasant-tailed jacana - Hydrophasianus chirurgus
2.Pheasant-tailed jacana - Hydrophasianus chirurgus
Photo by Karunakanth

Hydrophasianus chirurgus
3.Pheasant-tailed jacana (Hydrophasianus chirurgus)
Photo by Karunakanth

Hydrophasianus chirurgus
4.Pheasant-tailed jacana (Hydrophasianus chirurgus)
Photo by PJeganathan

Hydrophasianus chirurgus
5.Pheasant-tailed jacana (Hydrophasianus chirurgus)
Photo by PJeganathan

Hydrophasianus chirurgus
6.Hydrophasianus chirurgus Photo by Sarala Gamage

Hydrophasianus chirurgus
7.Hydrophasianus chirurgus Photo by jinchin lin

Hydrophasianus chirurgus
8.Hydrophasianus chirurgus Photo by Sanjeev Jassal

Hydrophasianus chirurgus
9.Hydrophasianus chirurgus Photo by Tsrawal

Hydrophasianus chirurgus
10.Hydrophasianus chirurgus Photo by Arun.arunb

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1.Photo source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Its_busy_time.jpg (cropped)
Photo author: Ramjeesk | License: CC BY-SA 4.0
2.Photo source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pheasant-tailed_Jacana*.jpg (cropped)
Author: Karunakanth | License: CC BY-SA 4.0
3.Photo source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/ (cropped)
Author: Karunakanth | License: CC BY-SA 4.0
4.Photo source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pheasant-tailed_jacana_(Hydrophasianus_chirurgus)_from_Aranthangi_JEG3996.jpg (cropped)
Author: PJeganathan | License: CC BY-SA 4.0
5.Photo source: https://commons.wikimedia.org (cropped)
Author: PJeganathan | License: CC BY-SA 4.0
6.Photo source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pheasant-tailed_jacana.jpg (cropped)
Author: Sarala Gamage | License: CC BY-SA 4.0
7.Photo source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/jinchinlin/5698829681/ (cropped)
Author: jinchin lin | License: CC BY 2.0 as on 5/19/17
8.Photo source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pheasant_tailed_jacana_SJ.jpg (cropped)
Author: Sanjeev Jassal | License: CC BY-SA 4.0
9.Photo source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pheasant-tailed_Jacana,_juvenile,_at_Nagpur,_by_Dr._Tejinder_Singh_Rawal.jpg (cropped)
Author: Tsrawal | License: CC BY-SA 3.0
10.Photo source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pheasant-tailed_jacana_non_breeding.jpg (cropped)
Author: Arun.arunb | License: CC BY-SA 4.0
Current topic in Birds of India: Pheasant-tailed jacana (Hydrophasianus chirurgus) photos.
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Thursday, May 18

Pheasant-tailed jacana

   ›      ›   Pheasant-tailed jacana - Hydrophasianus chirurgus

The pheasant-tailed jacana (Hydrophasianus chirurgus) is a wader belonging to the family of jacanas, Jacanidae.

The pheasant-tailed jacana species are distributed in the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia, China, Japan, Taiwan and Oman. These jacana species have long legs and toes, an adaptation for the life on floating vegetation. These jacanas are monotypic species.

Overview & Quick Facts Description & Identification
Pictures of Pheasant-tailed Jacana Distribution & Range
Ecosystem & Habitat Diet & Feeding Behavior
Breeding Habits Migration & Movement Patterns
Conservation & Survival IUCN Status
Taxonomy & Classification Bird World

Pheasant-tailed jacana - Overview

  • Scientific name: Hydrophasianus chirurgus
  • Species author: (Scopoli, 1786)
  • Synonyms/Protonym: Tringa Chirurgus Scopoli, 1786
  • Family: Jacanidae › Charadriiformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • Vernacular names: English: Pheasant-tailed jacana, Chinese: 水雉, French: Jacana à longue queue, German: Wasserfasan, Spanish: Jacana colilarga, Russian: Водяной фазанчик, Japanese: レンカク, Malay: Burung Teratai Besar
  • Other names: Waterpheasant
  • Distribution: Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia, China, Japan, Taiwan, Oman
  • Diet and feeding habits: insects, invertebrates
  • IUCN status listing: Least Concern (LC)

Appearance, physical description and identification

The pheasant-tailed jacana (Hydrophasianus chirurgus) is the only jacana with breeding plumage. In breeding plumage it measures 40 to 60 cm in length, including its 25 to 35 cm tail. The female is slightly larger and weighs 190 to 230 grams whereas the male weighs 120 to 140 grams.
In breeding pheasant-tailed jacana, the body is blackish and the tail is long. The head is white with a black patch on the rear crown, which varies in size. A narrow black necklace line from the upper nape extends down to the upper breast, separating white front of the neck from the glossy golden rear neck.

The upperparts and lowerparts of pheasant-tailed jacana are blackish chocolate brown, with green or purple lustre. Except for the brown tertials, black tips of outermost secondaries and primaries and the black edges of three outer primaries, the wings are white. The tips of the outer primaries are elongated.

The tail of pheasant-tailed jacana is blackish and the two central pair of feathers are stiff, slightly down-curved and elongated. The bill is slender and is slaty-blue with yellow tip. The legs and toes are very long and are pale bluish gray. The breeding birds call is a mewing "m-e-e-ou" sound.

In non-breeding pheasant-tailed jacana, the upperparts are pale greenish brown and the underparts are white. The crown becomes blackish, the rear neck becomes brown and the golden area is reduced to a few patches.

A brownish black line from the lore region passes through the eyes, down the sides of the neck to join on the upper breast. The non-breeding jacana tail is shorter and white with greenish brown central feathers. The legs and toes are greenish-bluish.
Indian birds - Picture of Pheasant-tailed jacana - Hydrophasianus chirurgus
Birds of India - Image of Pheasant-tailed jacana Hydrophasianus chirurgus by Ramjeesk

Birds of India - Photo of Pheasant-tailed jacana - Hydrophasianus chirurgus
Indian birds - Picture of Pheasant-tailed jacana - Hydrophasianus chirurgus by Karunakanth

Indian birds - Image of Pheasant-tailed jacana - Hydrophasianus chirurgus
Birds of India - Photo of Pheasant-tailed jacana - Hydrophasianus chirurgus by Karunakanth

Origin, geographical range and distribution

The pheasant-tailed jacana species are distributed in India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Philippines, China, Japan, Taiwan and Oman.

Vagrant pheasant-tailed jacana have been observed in Yemen, Qatar, Afghanistan and Australia. The Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBA) of these jacana species in Bangladesh are Tanguar Haor and Panabeel.

Ecosystem and habitat

These pheasant-tailed jacana species do not normally occur in forests. These species occur in altitudes from 0 to 3000 meters.

The natural ecosystems of these pheasant-tailed jacana species include wetlands like freshwater lakes, marshes, pools, ponds, swamps, peatlands and flooded grasslands.

Diet and feeding behavior

The diet of these pheasant-tailed jacana species is mostly insects. Floating insects, small molluscs and probably plant seeds are their primary food. They forage by walk over the floating vegetation or by swimming.

Reproduction and breeding habits

The breeding season of these pheasant-tailed jacana species is mainly in summer from March to July. The breeding season in South India coincides with the monsoon rains. In Sri Lanka, the laying season is from January.

These pheasant-tailed jacanas are polyandrous. They breed in freshwater lakes and ponds with emergent and floating vegetation. The nest is built with plant material. It may rest and float on water.

In one breeding season, a pheasant-tailed jacana female may lay up to ten clutches, to be incubated by several different males. The female pairs up and presents a clutch of 4 eggs to a male. A few days later the female pairs up with another male.

The brooding male pheasant-tailed jacana supporting itself with wings, scoops the eggs and keeps them warm between its breast and the underside of wings. If the nest is threatened by predator, rains or flood, the male may build another nest and move the eggs by carrying them one by one, wedged between the breast and bill.

Migration and movement patterns

The pheasant-tailed jacana species are partially migrant birds.

The northern populations (China and Himalayas) of jacana migrate southwards for wintering. They move to southern Thailand, Malay peninsula, Sumatra, southeast and northeast india and Oman. The birds in higher altitudes may move to lower altitudes in winter.

The pheasant-tailed jacana populations in Sri Lanka, Philippines, central and northwest India, Myanmar, southern Pakistan, north Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam and Taiwan are resident.

Post breeding, the pheasant-tailed jacana juveniles may disperse and establish in new locations within the range. They may make local movements for feeding and breeding within their range. These jacana species also move in response to floods and drought.

Conservation and survival

The global population size of the pheasant-tailed jacana (Hydrophasianus chirurgus) is estimated to be more than 100,000 individual birds. The overall population trend of these jacana species is considered to be decreasing. Throughout its range it is reported to be locally common. The generation length is 4.8 years. Its distribution size is about 19,700,000 sq.km.

The pheasant-tailed jacana (Hydrophasianus chirurgus) does not approach the thresholds for being Vulnerable, either under the range size criterion or under the population trend criterion, or under the population size criterion. The ongoing habitat destruction and habitat fragmentation are the main threats that may endanger the survival of these pheasant-tailed jacana species.

IUCN and CITES status

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated the jacana species and has listed it as of "Least Concern". The CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) status is ‘Not Evaluated’ for the pheasant-tailed jacana (Hydrophasianus chirurgus).
Taxonomy and scientific classification of Hydrophasianus chirurgus
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Charadriiformes
Family:Jacanidae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Hydrophasianus
Species:H. chirurgus
Binomial name:Hydrophasianus chirurgus
IUCN status listing:
Least Concern
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1.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Its_busy_time.jpg (cropped)
Image author: Ramjeesk | License: CC BY-SA 4.0
2.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pheasant-tailed_Jacana*.jpg (cropped)
Image author: Karunakanth | License: CC BY-SA 4.0
3.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pheasant-tailed_Jacana**.jpg (cropped)
Image author: Karunakanth | License: CC BY-SA 4.0
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Wednesday, May 17

Wreathed hornbill photos

   ›      ›   Wreathed hornbill (Rhyticeros undulatus) photos
Taxonomic classification   <>   Photos
The wreathed hornbill (Rhyticeros undulatus) belongs to the family Bucerotidae under the order Bucerotiformes.


Conservation concerns of Rhyticeros undulatus

The survival of Rhyticeros undulatus is "threatened by illegal selective logging, habitat encroachment and local hunting pressure in unprotected tropical forestlands".

Logging has fragmented the habitat and created huge gaps in the vegetation thus these birds are easily sighted, making them more vulnerable to hunting.

Logging, agricultural expansion into forest areas and illegal logging of mature trees has lead to sharp decrease in the roosting sites and foraging sites (Ficus sp.) of wreathed hornbill. There is decline in the regeneration of the preferred tree species (Ficus sp.).

The Rhyticeros undulatus species are important agents of seed dispersal in the moist evergreen forest. The entire ecosystem of these species is at cross roads. These birds require mature trees for nesting and also require foraging trees. The fragmented forest can only be effectively regenerated by these seed dispersers.

Reference:
Krishna, C.M., K. Sarma & A. Kumar (2012). Rapid assessment of Wreathed Hornbill Aceros undulatus (Aves: Bucerotidae) populations and conservation issues in fragmented lowland tropical forests of Arunachal Pradesh, India. Journal of Threatened Taxa 4(14): 3342–3348.
Taxonomic classification
Binomial name:Rhyticeros undulatus
Species:R. undulatus
Genus:Rhyticeros
Subfamily:-
Family:Bucerotidae
Order:Bucerotiformes
Class:Aves
Phylum:Chordata
Kingdom:Animalia

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Photos
Wreathed hornbill - Rhyticeros undulatus - male
1.Wreathed hornbill (Rhyticeros undulatus) male
Photo by Jar0d

Wreathed hornbill - Rhyticeros undulatus female
2.Wreathed hornbill (Rhyticeros undulatus) female
Photo by DickDaniels

Rhyticeros undulatus male
3.Wreathed hornbill - Rhyticeros undulatus
Photo by DickDaniels

Rhyticeros undulatus
4.Wreathed hornbill - Rhyticeros undulatus
Photo by Josh More

Rhyticeros undulatus
5.Wreathed hornbill - Rhyticeros undulatus
Photo by Gunawan Kartapranata

Rhyticeros undulatus
6.Wreathed hornbill - Rhyticeros undulatus
Photo by tontantravel

Rhyticeros undulatus
7.Rhyticeros undulatus Photo by B20180

Rhyticeros undulatus
8.Rhyticeros undulatus by Jar0d

Rhyticeros undulatus
9.Rhyticeros undulatus Photo by DickDaniels

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1.Photo source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Rhyticeros_undulatus_-Diergaarde_Blijdorp_-male-8a.jpg (cropped)
Author: Jar0d | License: CC BY-SA 2.0 as on 5/16/17
2.Photo source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Wreathed_Hornbiil_female_RWD.jpg (cropped)
Author: DickDaniels (http://carolinabirds.org/) | License: CC BY-SA 4.0
3.Photo source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Wreathed_Hornbill_male_RWD.jpg (cropped)
Author: DickDaniels (http://carolinabirds.org/) | License: CC BY-SA 4.0
4.Photo source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/guppiecat/28993206834/
Author: Josh More | License: CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 as on 5/17/17
5.Photo source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Wreathed_Hornbill_(Rhyticeros_undulatus)_in_TMII_Birdpark.jpg (cropped)
Author: Gunawan Kartapranata | License: CC BY-SA 3.0
6.Photo source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/tontantravel/8913975826/ (cropped)
Author: tontantravel | License: CC BY-SA 2.0 as on 5/16/17
7.Photo source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/ (cropped)
Author: B20180 | License: CC BY-SA 4.0
8.Photo source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rhyticeros_undulatus_-Diergaarde_Blijdorp_-juvinile_male_flying-8a.jpg (cropped)
Author: Jar0d | License: CC BY-SA 2.0 as on 5/16/17
9.Photo source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Wreathed_Hornbill_male_RWD14.jpg (cropped)
Author: DickDaniels (http://carolinabirds.org/) | License: CC BY-SA 3.0
Current topic in Birds of India: Wreathed hornbill (Rhyticeros undulatus) photos.
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Tuesday, May 16

Wreathed hornbill

   ›      ›   Wreathed hornbill - Rhyticeros undulatus

The wreathed hornbill (Rhyticeros undulatus) is a large hornbill belonging to the family, Bucerotidae.

The wreathed hornbill species are distributed in India, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia, Malaysia, Indonesia and Brunei. These hornbill species are highly dependent on forest and the ongoing deforestation in their habitats is causing decline in their population. These hornbills are monotypic species.

Overview & Quick Facts Description & Identification
Pictures of Wreathed Hornbill Distribution & Range
Ecosystem & Habitat Diet & Feeding Behavior
Breeding Habits Migration & Movement Patterns
Conservation & Survival IUCN Status
Taxonomy & Classification Bird World

Wreathed hornbill - Overview

  • Scientific name: Rhyticeros undulatus
  • Species author: (Shaw, 1811)
  • Synonyms/Protonym: Buceros undulatus Shaw, 1811, Aceros undulatus
  • Family: Bucerotidae › Bucerotiformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • Vernacular names: English: Wreathed hornbill, Chinese: 花冠皱盔犀鸟, French: Calao festonné, German: Furchenhornvogel, Spanish: Cálao gorjinegro, Russian: Волнистый калао, Japanese: シワコブサイチョウ, Indonesian: Burung Julang Emas
  • Other names: Bar-pouched Wreathed Hornbill, Northern Waved Hornbill, Plait-billed Hornbill
  • Distribution: India, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia, Malaysia, Indonesia, Brunei
  • Diet and feeding habits: fruits, small animals
  • IUCN status listing: Least Concern (LC)
The wreathed hornbill (Rhyticeros undulatus) is closely related to plain-pouched hornbill (Rhyticeros subruficollis).

Appearance, physical description and identification

The wreathed hornbill (Rhyticeros undulatus) is a large hornbill, measuring 75 to 85 cm in length. There is sexual dimorphism and the male is slightly larger and weighs 1650 to 3650 grams. The female weighs 1350 to 2700 grams.

In adult wreathed hornbill the overall plumage is blackish. They have black wings and short white tail. Adult birds have prominent corrugated casque. The bill is also corrugated and colored creamy. There is reddish circumorbital skin.

The male wreathed hornbill has rufous brown forehead, crown and nape. The sides of the head, fore neck and upper breast are whitish. There is yellow gular pouch with dark bar. The irises are red.

The female hornbill has black head and neck. The gular pouch is colored blue. The irises are brown. The immature birds appear similar to males and lack casque and corrugation on the bill. The irises are pale blue.

After the first year, the casque and corrugation on the bill develop in young adults. The feet are gray. Their call is loud gasping "uk-hweerk" and “coo-cuk” sound.
Indian birds - Picture of Wreathed hornbill - Rhyticeros undulatus
Birds of India - Image of Wreathed hornbill - Rhyticeros undulatus by Jar0d

Birds of India - Photo of Wreathed hornbill - Rhyticeros undulatus
Indian birds - Picture of Wreathed hornbill - Rhyticeros undulatus by DickDaniels

Indian birds - Image of Wreathed hornbill - Rhyticeros undulatus
Birds of India - Photo of Wreathed hornbill - Rhyticeros undulatus by DickDaniels

Origin, geographical range and distribution

The wreathed hornbill species are distributed in India, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia, Malaysia, Indonesia and Brunei.

In India, these hornbill species are distributed in the states of Assam, Arunachal Pradesh, Meghalaya, Nagaland, Manipur, Tripura and Mizoram.

Ecosystem and habitat

These wreathed hornbill species have high forest dependence. These species occur in altitudes from 0 to 2560 meters.

The natural ecosystems of these wreathed hornbill species include tropical and subtropical moist lowland forests, primary evergreen forests and tropical and subtropical moist montane forests.

Diet and feeding behavior

The diet of these wreathed hornbill species is mostly fruits. Wild fruits, berries, figs and small animals are their primary food.

Reproduction and breeding habits

The breeding season of these wreathed hornbill species in India is from April to June. The breeding season is from January to March in Myanmar and Thailand. The laying season in Indonesia is from March to September.

These wreathed hornbill species are monogamous and are highly territorial. They nest in tree holes. They prefer the deciduous tree species Tetrameles nudiflora, which have large hollows in the trunk and branches. The same nesting site may be used in consecutive breeding seasons.

The nesting sites disturbed by human activities may be abandoned. Loss of nesting habitat and nesting trees has a direct effect on the breeding success of these wreathed hornbill species.

The breeding female enters the hollow and seals the hole with its droppings, mud and fruit pulp. A small aperture is left for the male to transfer food to the mother and the chicks. The typical clutch contains two or three pale white eggs.

Migration and movement patterns

The wreathed hornbill species are non-migrant resident birds.

Post breeding, the wreathed hornbill juveniles may disperse and establish in new locations within the range. They may make local movements for feeding and breeding within their range.

Conservation and survival

The global population size of the wreathed hornbill (Rhyticeros undulatus) has not been quantified. The overall population trend of this species is considered to be decreasing. Throughout its range it is reported to be locally common. The generation length is 19 years. Its distribution size is about 7,020,000 sq.km.

The wreathed hornbill (Rhyticeros undulatus) does not approach the thresholds for being Vulnerable, either under the range size criterion or under the population trend criterion, or under the population size criterion. The ongoing habitat destruction, habitat fragmentation and hunting are the main threats that may endanger the survival of these species.

IUCN and CITES status

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated the hornbill species and has listed it as of "Least Concern". The CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) status is ‘Evaluated’ for the wreathed hornbill (Rhyticeros undulatus) and is listed in Appendix II.
Taxonomy and scientific classification of Rhyticeros undulatus
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Bucerotiformes
Family:Bucerotidae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Rhyticeros
Species:R. undulatus
Binomial name:Rhyticeros undulatus
IUCN status listing:
Least Concern
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Cream-coloured courser Collared kingfisher
Himalayan swiftlet Ward's trogon
European roller Blyth's kingfisher
Pallas's sandgrouse Yellow-eyed pigeon
Plum-headed parakeet Whistling hawk-cuckoo
Pallid scops owl Sykes's nightjar
Edible-nest swiftlet Indian roller
Common kingfisher South polar skua
Pin-tailed sandgrouse Common wood pigeon

1.Image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Rhyticeros_undulatus_-Diergaarde_Blijdorp_-male-8a.jpg (cropped)
Image author: Jar0d | License: CC BY-SA 2.0 as on 5/16/17
2.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Wreathed_Hornbiil_female_RWD.jpg (cropped)
Image author: DickDaniels (http://carolinabirds.org/) | License: CC BY-SA 4.0
3.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Wreathed_Hornbill_male_RWD.jpg (cropped)
Image author: DickDaniels (http://carolinabirds.org/) | License: CC BY-SA 4.0
Current topic in Birds of India: Wreathed hornbill - Rhyticeros undulatus.
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Monday, May 15

Crested kingfisher photos

   ›      ›   Crested kingfisher (Megaceryle lugubris) photos
Taxonomic classification   <>   Photos
The crested kingfisher (Megaceryle lugubris) belongs to the family Alcedinidae under the order Coraciiformes.

Water kingfishers

The species Megaceryle lugubris are grouped under the subfamily Cerylinae. The Cerylinae are all specialist fish-eating species. This subfamily has three genera, viz, Megaceryle, Ceryle and Chloroceryle.

Megaceryle is a genus of very large birds comprising four species, viz, Megaceryle lugubris, Megaceryle maxima, Megaceryle torquata and Megaceryle alcyon. All these species are specialist fish-eaters. All of the Megaceryle spp. have prominent stiff crest on their heads.

The crested kingfisher species sit on a perch stolidly and spend much of their time in quiet surveillance. Their prefered perch is usually and branch of tree near water, edge of a bank or jutting rocks amidst flowing water.

On spotting a manageable prey the bird dive head first into the water. The prey is grabbed in bill and the bird returns to the perch with the catch. The prey is battered against the perch until it is immobile and then it is swallowed whole.

Their retina is adapted to instantaneously change from air vision to vision under water. They have pretty fast reflexes. They also can dive from hovering flight, especially when the water is choppy. They may dive to a depth of 60 cm or more.
Taxonomic classification
Binomial name:Megaceryle lugubris
Species:M. lugubris
Genus:Megaceryle
Subfamily:Cerylinae
Family:Alcedinidae
Order:Coraciiformes
Class:Aves
Phylum:Chordata
Kingdom:Animalia
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Photos
Crested kingfisher - Megaceryle lugubris
1.Crested kingfisher - Megaceryle lugubris - Photo by Tokumi

Crested kingfisher - Megaceryle lugubris
2.Crested kingfisher - Megaceryle lugubris - Photo by Mprasannak

Megaceryle lugubris
3.Crested kingfisher - Megaceryle lugubris - Photo by HIRO KOTA

Megaceryle lugubris
4.Crested kingfisher - Megaceryle lugubris - Photo by Tokumi

Megaceryle lugubris
5.Crested kingfisher - Megaceryle lugubris - Photo by HIRO KOTA

Megaceryle lugubris
6.Crested kingfisher - Megaceryle lugubris by Tokumi

Megaceryle lugubris
7.Crested kingfisher - Megaceryle lugubris by HIRO KOTA

Megaceryle lugubris
8.Crested kingfisher - Megaceryle lugubris by Arghyadeep98

Megaceryle lugubris
9.Megaceryle lugubris photo by HIRO KOTA

Megaceryle lugubris
10.Megaceryle lugubris by Francesco Veronesi

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1.Photo source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Wiki-yamsemi1.jpg (cropped)
Author: Tokumi | License: Public domain
2.Photo source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Crested_Kingfisher_Prasanna_Mamidala.jpg (cropped)
Author: Mprasannak | License: CC BY-SA 4.0
3.Photo source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/137769404@N04/27664299495/
Author: HIRO KOTA | License: CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 as on 5/14/17
4.Photo source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Megaceryle_lugubris,_crop.jpg (cropped)
Author: Tokumi | License: Public domain
5.Photo source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/137769404@N04/31502436565/
Author: HIRO KOTA | License: CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 as on 5/14/17
6.Photo source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Wiki-yamasemi-mesu,_crop.jpg (cropped)
Author: Tokumi | License: Public domain
7.Photo source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/137769404@N04/31464894546/
Author: HIRO KOTA | License: CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 as on 5/14/17
8.Photo source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Crested_Kingfisher.jpg (cropped)
Author: Arghyadeep98 | License: CC BY-SA 4.0
9.Photo source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/137769404@N04/26846340404/
Author: HIRO KOTA | License: CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 as on 5/14/17
10.Photo source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Crested_Kingfisher_-_Bhutan_S4E9419_(16130560610).jpg (cropped)
Author: Francesco Veronesi | License: CC BY-SA 2.0 as on 5/14/17
Current topic in Birds of India: Crested kingfisher (Megaceryle lugubris) photos.
Contact State Tourism or travel agents for bird watching and wildlife tours.