Worm-eating warbler images


   ›      ›   Worm-eating warbler - Helmitheros vermivorum images
Taxonomic classification   < >   Images

The worm-eating warbler (Helmitheros vermivorum) belongs to the family Parulidae under the order Passeriformes.

Worm-eating warbler taxonomy

The Parulidae is the family of New World warblers or wood-warblers. The family Parulidae was first introduced by Frank Alexander Wetmore (June 18, 1886 – December 7, 1978), an American ornithologist and avian paleontologist, in the year 1947.

The family Parulidae comprises seventeen genera, including genus Helmitheros. The genus Helmitheros is monotypic and contains only one species Helmitheros vermivorum.

The genus Helmitheros was first described by Constantine Samuel Rafinesque-Schmaltz (22 October 1783 – 18 September 1840), a zoologist, botanist, writer and polyglot, in the year 1819.

The species Helmitheros vermivorum was first described (as Helmitheros vermivorus) by Johann Friedrich Gmelin (8 August 1748 – 1 November 1804), a German naturalist, botanist, entomologist and herpetologist, in the year 1789.

The species H. vermivorum is monotypic. As this species is mostly insectivorous and any reduction in the insect population due to pesticide use will have a telling effect on the survival of this warbler species.

Taxonomic classification
Binomial name:Helmitheros vermivorum
Species:H. vermivorum
Genus:Helmitheros
Subfamily:-
Family:Parulidae
Order:Passeriformes
Class:Aves
Phylum:Chordata
Kingdom:Animalia
Worm-eating warbler - Helmitheros vermivorum
1.Worm-eating warbler - Helmitheros vermivorum
Image by Aaron Maizlish


Helmitheros vermivorum
2.Worm-eating warbler - Helmitheros vermivorum
Image by Aaron Maizlish

Helmitheros vermivorum
3.Worm-eating warbler - Helmitheros vermivorum
Image by http://www.birdphotos.com

Helmitheros vermivorum
4.Worm-eating warbler - Helmitheros vermivorum
Image by Andy Reago & Chrissy McClarren

Helmitheros vermivorum
5.Worm-eating warbler - Helmitheros vermivorum
Image by Jerry Oldenettel

Helmitheros vermivorum
6.Worm-eating warbler - Helmitheros vermivorum
Image by Jerry Oldenettel

Helmitheros vermivorum
7.Helmitheros vermivorum
Image by Daniel Arndt

Helmitheros vermivorum
8.Helmitheros vermivorum
Image by Tom Murray
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1.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/amaizlish/26981372974/in/photostream/ (cropped)
Author: Aaron Maizlish | License: CC BY-NC 2.0 as on 10/19/18
2.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/amaizlish/14356307193/ (cropped)
Author: Aaron Maizlish | License: CC BY-NC 2.0 as on 10/19/18
3.Image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Worm-eating_Warbler.jpg (cropped)
Author: http://www.birdphotos.com | License: CC BY 3.0 as on 10/19/18
4.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/wildreturn/8666036177/ (cropped)
Author: Andy Reago & Chrissy McClarren | License: CC BY 2.0 as on 10/19/18
5.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/jroldenettel/2930646578/in/photostream/ (cropped)
Author: Jerry Oldenettel | License: CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 as on 10/19/18
6.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/jroldenettel/2930646786/in/photostream/ (cropped)
Author: Jerry Oldenettel | License: CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 as on 10/19/18
7.Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ubermoogle/27070515791/in/photostream/ (cropped)
Author: Daniel Arndt | License: CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 as on 10/19/18
8.Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/tmurray74/34769904696/in/photostream/ (cropped)
Author: Tom Murray | License: CC BY-NC 2.0 as on 10/19/18
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Worm-eating warbler | American birds


   ›      ›   Worm-eating warbler - Helmitheros vermivorum

The worm-eating warbler (Helmitheros vermivorum) belongs to the family of New World warblers, the Parulidae.

The worm-eating warbler is distributed over South America, North America, Central America and the Caribbean region. These warbler species feed on insects, insect larvae and caterpillars. These warblers are monotypic species.

Overview & Quick Facts Description & Identification
Pictures of Worm-eating Warbler Distribution & Range
Ecosystem & Habitat Diet & Feeding Behavior
Breeding Habits Migration & Movement Patterns
Conservation & Survival IUCN Status
Taxonomy & Classification Bird World

Appearance, physical description and identification

The worm-eating warbler (Helmitheros vermivorum) is a small warbler, measuring 12-13 cm in length and weighing 11 to 17 grams.

The worm-eating warbler has buff colored head with a broad black crown stripe extending to nape. There is a black eye stripe extending to the side of the neck. The upperparts are olive brown. The underparts are pale buff.

The large, long black bill is pinkish gray. The irises are blackish. There is a pale white eye-ring. The legs and feet are pinkish. The call is a loud, clear "chip" or a short high-pitched trilling sound.
Bird World - Image of Worm-eating warbler - Helmitheros vermivorum
1.Bird World - Image of Worm-eating warbler - Helmitheros vermivorum
by Aaron Maizlish


Bird World - Image of Worm-eating warbler - Helmitheros vermivorum
2.Bird World - Image of Worm-eating warbler - Helmitheros vermivorum
by Aaron Maizlish

Bird World - Image of Worm-eating warbler - Helmitheros vermivorum
3.Bird World - Image of Worm-eating warbler - Helmitheros vermivorum
by http://www.birdphotos.com

Origin, geographical range and distribution

The worm-eating warbler is distributed in eastern and southern parts of USA, Caribbean region, Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama and northwestern extreme of Colombia and Venezuela.

Ecosystem and habitat

The worm-eating warbler species have moderate forest dependence. They normally occur in altitudes between 0 to 1500 meters.

The natural ecosystems and habitats of these species include subtropical and tropical dry forests, deciduous and mixed forests, moist lowland forests, mangrove forests, temperate forests and pine plantations.

Diet and feeding behavior

The diet of the worm-eating warbler species consists mainly of insects. Larval insects, caterpillars, insects, bees, beetles and spiders are their primary food.

These warbler species primarily forage by gleaning in the understorey and on the ground. The species name appears to be a misnomer. Apparently worms are not a significant source of nourishment for these species.

Reproduction and breeding habits

The breeding season of the worm-eating warbler species is from May to July in most of their breeding range. The breeding sites are found in wooded slopes of dense deciduous forests.

These species are monogamous and highly territorial. They nest usually on the ground. The nest is well hidden among dead leaves. The nest is a cup of dead leaves, lined with hair moss and leaves.

The female warbler builds the nest and incubates the eggs. The clutch contains three to six glossy white eggs with brown spotting on the broader side. The chicks hatch out after 13 days and leave the nest after ten days.

Migration and movement patterns

The worm-eating warbler species are migratory birds. Breeding populations occur in eastern and southern parts of USA (excluding Florida peninsula). After breeding, they move southwards for wintering.

The warblers winter in Caribbean region, Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama and northwestern extreme of Colombia and Venezuela.

They return to the breeding grounds in early summer. Passage birds are found in coastal areas of Gulf of Mexico and Florida.

Worm-eating warbler - Quick Facts

  • Scientific name: Helmitheros vermivorum
  • Species author: (Gmelin 1789)
  • Synonyms/Protonym: Motacilla vermivora J. F. Gmelin, 1789
  • Family: Parulidae › Passeriformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia,
  • Vernacular names: English: Worm-eating warbler, Chinese: 食虫莺, French: Paruline vermivore, German: Haldenwaldsänger, Spanish: Reinita gusanera, Russian: Настоящая червеедка, Japanese: フタスジアメリカムシクイ
  • Other names: Worm-eating Warbler
  • Distribution: South America, North America, Caribbean
  • Diet and feeding habits: insects, invertebrates, caterpillars, worms, spiders
  • IUCN status listing: Least Concern (LC)

Conservation and survival

The global population size of the worm-eating warbler (Helmitheros vermivorum) has not been quantified. The overall population trend of the species is considered to be increasing.

In most of its range, this species is reported to be common. The generation length is 3.9 years. Its distribution size is about 2,520,000 sq.km.

Ecosystem degradation, ecosystem conversion, agricultural expansion, deforestation and logging activities are the main threats that are endangering the survival of this warbler species.

IUCN and CITES status

The worm-eating warbler (Helmitheros vermivorum) does not approach the thresholds for being Vulnerable either under the range size criterion or under the population trend criterion or under the population size criterion.

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated the warbler species and has listed it as of "Least Concern".

The CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) status is ‘Not Evaluated’ for the worm-eating warbler (Helmitheros vermivorum).
Taxonomy and scientific classification of Helmitheros vermivorum
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Passeriformes
Family:Parulidae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Helmitheros
Species:H. vermivorum
Binomial name:Helmitheros vermivorum
IUCN status listing:
Least Concern
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1.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/amaizlish/26981372974/in/photostream/ (cropped)
Image author: Aaron Maizlish | License: CC BY-NC 2.0 as on 10/19/18
2.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/amaizlish/14356307193/ (cropped)
Image author: Aaron Maizlish | License: CC BY-NC 2.0 as on 10/19/18
3.Image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Worm-eating_Warbler.jpg (cropped)
Image author: http://www.birdphotos.com | License: CC BY 3.0 as on 10/19/18
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Black oropendola | American birds


   ›      ›   Black oropendola - Psarocolius guatimozinus

The black oropendola (Psarocolius guatimozinus) belongs to the family of grackles, cowbirds and oropendolas, the Icteridae.

The black oropendola is distributed over eastern Panama in North America and northwest Colombia in South America. These oropendola species are restricted-range species. These oropendolas are monotypic species.

Overview & Quick Facts Description & Identification
Pictures of Black Oropendola Distribution & Range
Ecosystem & Habitat Diet & Feeding Behavior
Breeding Habits Migration & Movement Patterns
Conservation & Survival IUCN Status
Taxonomy & Classification Bird World

Appearance, physical description and identification

The black oropendola (Psarocolius guatimozinus) is a medium-sized oropendola, measuring 40 to 47 cm in length. The males are slightly larger.

The black oropendola has blackish plumage. The back, rump and part of wing coverts are deep chestnut. The tail is yellow with dark gray central feathers. There is a bare blue patch on the face and pink wattle at the base of bill.

The large black bill is tipped yellow. The irises are very pale and creamy. There is a pale gray eye-ring. The legs and feet are grayish. The call is a high pitched "chew.. chew" sound.
Bird World - Image of Black oropendola - Psarocolius guatimozinus
1.Bird World - Image of Black oropendola - Psarocolius guatimozinus by John Gerrard Keulemans


Origin, geographical range and distribution

The black oropendola is distributed over eastern Panama in North America and northwest Colombia in South America. These species are restricted-range species and they are monotypic species.

The Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBA) of black oropendola species in Panama is Darién National Park and in Colombia is Parque Nacional Natural Los Katíos.

Ecosystem and habitat

The black oropendola species have moderate forest dependence. They normally occur in altitudes between 0 to 800 meters.

The natural ecosystems and habitats of these species include subtropical and tropical dry forests, subtropical and tropical moist lowland forests and forest edge near plantations.

Diet and feeding behavior

The diet of the black oropendola species consists mainly of insects. Invertebrates, insects, spiders, small vertebrates, fruits and nectar are their primary food. These species mostly forage high in the canopy.

Reproduction and breeding habits

The breeding season of this oropendola species is in January and February in Panama. The laying season is from April to June in Colombia. These species are colonial breeders. Polygynous behavior has been observed.

The breeding sites include tall trees with horizontal branches. The hanging nests are woven with grass and plant fibers. The clutch contains pale pink eggs with reddish brown blotches. The female takes care of the young.

Migration and movement patterns

The black oropendola species are non-migratory resident birds. Post breeding, the juveniles may disperse and establish in new locations within the range. Within their range they may make local movements for feeding and breeding.

Black oropendola - Quick Facts

  • Scientific name: Psarocolius guatimozinus
  • Species author: (Bonaparte, 1853)
  • Synonyms/Protonym: Ostinops guatimozinus Bonaparte, 1853
  • Family: Icteridae › Passeriformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia,
  • Vernacular names: English: Black oropendola, Chinese: 黑拟掠鸟, French: Cassique noir, German: Anthrazitstirnvogel, Spanish: Cacique negro, Russian: Чёрная оропендола, Japanese: クロオオツリスドリ
  • Other names: Black Oropendola
  • Distribution: South America (northwest Colombia), North America ( east Panama).
  • Diet and feeding habits: fruits, insects, invertebrates, small vertebrates
  • IUCN status listing: Least Concern (LC)

Conservation and survival

The global population size of the black oropendola (Psarocolius guatimozinus) has not been quantified. The overall population trend of the species is considered to be stable.

In most of its range, this species is reported to be 'fairly common' (Stotz et al. 1996). The generation length is 4.6 years. Its distribution size is about 154,000 sq.km.

Ecosystem degradation, ecosystem conversion, agricultural expansion, deforestation and logging activities are the main threats that are endangering the survival of this oropendola species.

IUCN and CITES status

The black oropendola (Psarocolius guatimozinus) does not approach the thresholds for being Vulnerable either under the range size criterion or under the population trend criterion or under the population size criterion.

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated the oropendola species and has listed it as of "Least Concern".

The CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) status is ‘Not Evaluated’ for the black oropendola (Psarocolius guatimozinus).
Taxonomy and scientific classification of Psarocolius guatimozinus
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Passeriformes
Family:Icteridae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Psarocolius
Species:P. guatimozinus
Binomial name:Psarocolius guatimozinus
IUCN status listing:
Least Concern
The black oropendola (Psarocolius guatimozinus) is closely related to the Montezuma oropendola (Psarocolius montezuma) and the Baudó oropendola (Psarocolius cassini).
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Image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Psarocolius_guatimozinus_1902.jpg
Image author: John Gerrard Keulemans (1842–1912) | Public domain
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Saffron siskin | American birds


   ›      ›   Saffron siskin - Spinus siemiradzkii

The saffron siskin (Spinus siemiradzkii) belongs to the family of siskins, canaries and grosbeaks, the Fringillidae.

The saffron siskin is distributed over southwestern Ecuador and northwestern Peru in South America. These siskin species are listed as "Vulnerable" by the IUCN. These siskins are monotypic species.

Overview & Quick Facts Description & Identification
Pictures of Saffron Siskin Distribution & Range
Ecosystem & Habitat Diet & Feeding Behavior
Breeding Habits Migration & Movement Patterns
Conservation & Survival IUCN Status
Taxonomy & Classification Bird World

Appearance, physical description and identification

The saffron siskin (Spinus siemiradzkii) is a small siskin, measuring 10 to 11 cm in length.

The male saffron siskin has glossy black hood covering the head, nape and throat. The lower neck and back are grayish yellow. The underparts, rump and the tail are bright yellow. The tail has a broad black terminal band.

The saffron siskin wings are black with yellow patches. The female has overall greenish yellow plumage and lacks black on the head. The terminal tail band is grayish in female.

The grayish bill is short and sharp. The irises are blackish. There is a pale gray eye-ring. The legs and feet are short and grayish. The call is a high pitched twittering sound.
Bird World - Image of Saffron siskin - Spinus siemiradzkii
1.Bird World - Image of Saffron siskin - Spinus siemiradzkii by John Gerrard Keulemans


Origin, geographical range and distribution

The saffron siskin is distributed over southwestern Ecuador and northwestern Peru in South America.

The Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBA) of saffron siskin species in Peru are, Parque Nacional Cerros de Amotape and Coto de Caza El Angolo.

Some of the IBA of these birds in Ecuador are, La Tagua, Engunga, Parque Nacional Machalilla y alrededores, Cañón del río Catamayo, Bosque Protector Puyango, Bosque Protector Cerro Blanco and Bosque Protector Chongón-Colonche.

Ecosystem and habitat

The saffron siskin species have low forest dependence. They normally occur in altitudes between 0 to 750 meters. The artificial ecosystems and habitats of these species include urban areas and rural gardens.

The natural ecosystems and habitats of these species include subtropical and tropical dry forests, edges of dry woodlands, subtropical and tropical grasslands, lowland dry deciduous forests and dry shrublands.

Diet and feeding behavior

The diet of the saffron siskin species consists mainly of plant matter. Wild seeds, grains, flowers, buds, leaves and insects are their primary food. These species forage mostly on the ground.

Reproduction and breeding habits

The breeding season of this siskin species is from January to May, during the wet season. Not much is known about its breeding and nesting habits.

Migration and movement patterns

The saffron siskin species are non-migratory resident birds. Nomadic movements have been observed in these species in response to climatic conditions.

Post breeding, the juveniles may disperse and establish in new locations within the range. Within their range they may make local movements for feeding and breeding.

Saffron siskin - Quick Facts

  • Scientific name: Spinus siemiradzkii
  • Species author: (Berlepsch & Taczanowski, 1884)
  • Synonyms/Protonym: Chrysomitris siemiradzkii Berlepsch and Taczanowski, 1884
  • Family: Fringillidae › Passeriformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia,
  • Vernacular names: English: Saffron siskin, Chinese: 红金翅雀, French: Tarin safran, German: Safranzeisig, Spanish: Jilguero azafranado, Russian: Шафрановый чиж, Japanese: サフランヒワ
  • Other names: Saffron Siskin
  • Distribution: South America (Ecuador and Peru)
  • Diet and feeding habits: seeds, flowers, buds, leaves, insects
  • IUCN status listing: Vulnerable (VU)

Conservation and survival

The global population size of the saffron siskin (Spinus siemiradzkii) is estimated to number about 1,500 to 7,000 individual birds. The overall population trend of the species is considered to be decreasing.

In most of its range, this species is reported to be uncommon to rare. The generation length is 4.2 years. Its distribution size is about 36,300 sq.km.

Ecosystem degradation, ecosystem conversion, agricultural expansion, deforestation and logging activities are the main threats that are endangering the survival of this siskin species.

IUCN and CITES status

The saffron siskin (Spinus siemiradzkii) has approached the thresholds for being Vulnerable, under the range size criterion, under the population trend criterion and under the population size criterion.

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated the siskin species and has listed it as "Vulnerable".

The CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) status is ‘Not Evaluated’ for the saffron siskin (Spinus siemiradzkii).
Taxonomy and scientific classification of Spinus siemiradzkii
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Passeriformes
Family:Fringillidae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Spinus
Species:S. siemiradzkii
Binomial name:Spinus siemiradzkii
IUCN status listing:
Vulnerable
The saffron siskin (Spinus siemiradzkii) is closely related to the hooded siskin (Spinus magellanicus).
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Image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:ChrysomitrisSiemiradzkiiKeulemans.jpg
Image author: John Gerrard Keulemans (1842–1912) | License: Public domain
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Common sandpiper images


   ›      ›   Common sandpiper - Actitis hypoleucos images
Taxonomic classification   < >   Images

The common sandpiper (Actitis hypoleucos) belongs to the family Scolopacidae under the order Charadriiformes.

Common sandpiper taxonomy

The Scolopacidae is the family of sandpipers, curlews and snipes. The family Scolopacidae was first described by Constantine Samuel Rafinesque-Schmaltz (22 October 1783 – 18 September 1840), a zoologist, botanist, writer and polyglot, in the year 1815.

The family Scolopacidae comprise fifteen genera, including genus Actitis. The genus Actitis is polytypic containing two species, Actitis hypoleucos and Actitis macularia.

The genus Actitis was first introduced by Johann Karl Wilhelm Illiger (19 November 1775 – 10 May 1813), a German entomologist and zoologist, in the year 1811.

The species Actitis hypoleucos was first described (as Tringa hypoleucos) by Carl Linnaeus (23 May 1707 – 10 January 1778), a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist, in the year 1758.

The species Actitis hypoleucos is closely related to the spotted sandpiper (A. macularia).

Taxonomic classification
Binomial name:Actitis hypoleucos
Species:A. hypoleucos
Genus:Actitis
Subfamily:-
Family:Scolopacidae
Order:Charadriiformes
Class:Aves
Phylum:Chordata
Kingdom:Animalia
Common sandpiper - Actitis hypoleucos
1.Common sandpiper - Actitis hypoleucos
Image by Vengolis


Actitis hypoleucos
2.Common sandpiper - Actitis hypoleucos
Image by Juan Emilio

Actitis hypoleucos
3.Common sandpiper - Actitis hypoleucos
Image by Dr. Raju Kasambe

Actitis hypoleucos
4.Common sandpiper - Actitis hypoleucos
Image by Alpsdake

Actitis hypoleucos
5.Actitis hypoleucos
Image by JJ Harrison

Actitis hypoleucos
6.Common sandpiper - Actitis hypoleucos
Image by Charles J Sharp

Actitis hypoleucos
7.Common sandpiper - Actitis hypoleucos
Image by Bernard DUPONT

Actitis hypoleucos
8.Actitis hypoleucos
Image by Alun Williams333

Actitis hypoleucos
9.Actitis hypoleucos
Image by Derek Keats
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1.Image source: https://wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Actitis_hypoleucos_2.jpg (cropped)
Author: Vengolis | License: CC BY-SA 3.0 as on 10/17/18
2.Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/juan_e/5012875116/ (cropped)
Author: Juan Emilio | License: CC BY-SA 2.0 as on 10/17/18
3.Image source: https://wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Common_Sandpiper_Actitis_hypoleucos_by_Dr._Raju_Kasambe_DSCN3001_(19).jpg (cropped)
Author: Dr. Raju Kasambe | License: CC BY-SA 4.0 as on 10/17/18
4.Image source: https://wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Actitis_hypoleucos_a2.jpg (cropped)
Author: Alpsdake | License: CC BY-SA 4.0 as on 10/17/18
5.Image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Actitis_hypoleucos_-_Laem_Pak_Bia.jpg (cropped)
Author: JJ Harrison | License: CC BY 3.0 as on 10/17/18
6.Source: https://wikimedia.org/ (cropped)
Author: Charles J Sharp | License: CC BY-SA 4.0 as on 10/17/18
7.Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/berniedup/16383064138/ (cropped)
Author: Bernard DUPONT | License: CC BY-SA 2.0 as on 10/17/18
8.Source: https://wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Actitis_hypoleucos_pibydd_y_dorlan.jpg (cropped)
Author: Alun Williams333 | License: CC BY-SA 4.0 as on 10/17/18
9.Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/dkeats/36684180261/in/photostream/ (cropped)
Author: Derek Keats | License: CC BY 2.0 as on 10/17/18
Detailed description and information on distribution, habitat, behavior, feeding and breeding habits, migration and conservation status of beautiful birds with their images.
Recently updated and current topic in Bird World: Common sandpiper - Actitis hypoleucos images.
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Common sandpiper


   ›      ›   Common sandpiper - Actitis hypoleucos

The common sandpiper (Actitis hypoleucos) belongs to the family of snipes and sandpipers, the Scolopacidae.

The common sandpiper is distributed in Europe, Asia, Africa, Indian subcontinent, southeast Asia and Australia. These sandpiper species are fully migratory birds. These sandpipers are monotypic species.

Overview & Quick Facts Description & Identification
Pictures of Common Sandpiper Distribution & Range
Ecosystem & Habitat Diet & Feeding Behavior
Breeding Habits Migration & Movement Patterns
Conservation & Survival IUCN Status
Taxonomy & Classification Bird World

Appearance, physical description and identification

The common sandpiper (Actitis hypoleucos) is a small sandpiper, measuring 18 to 22 cm in length and weighing 30 to 90 grams. The wingspan is 37 to 42 cm.

The common sandpiper has grayish brown upperparts, throat and breast. The underparts are white. The wintering birds are paler and have more conspicuous barring. There is a dark lore extending beyond the eye. There is a pale supercilium.

The grayish bill is long and sharp. The irises are blackish. There is a white eye-ring. The legs and feet are short and grayish yellow. The call is a loud, rapid squeaking sound.
Bird World - Image of Common sandpiper - Actitis hypoleucos
1.Bird World - Common sandpiper - Actitis hypoleucos
Image by Dr. Raju Kasambe


Bird World - Image of Common sandpiper - Actitis hypoleucos
2.Bird World - Common sandpiper - Actitis hypoleucos
Image by Vengolis

Bird World - Image of Common sandpiper - Actitis hypoleucos
3.Bird World - Common sandpiper - Actitis hypoleucos
Image by Juan Emilio

Origin, geographical range and distribution

The common sandpiper is distributed in Arctic, subarctic and temperate regions of Europe and Asia. The wintering populations are distributed in Africa, Arabian Peninsula, Indian subcontinent, southeast Asia, southern China and Australia.

Vagrant populations are found in USA, Samoa, New Zealand, Kiribati, Iceland, French Southern Territories, Fiji and Faroe Islands (Denmark).

The Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBA) of this species in Russia is Forty islands. The IBA in Austria are, Tyrolian Lech valley and Pielachtal.

Ecosystem and habitat

The sandpiper species have low forest dependence. They normally occur in altitudes between 0 to 100 meters.

The artificial ecosystems and habitats of these species include aquatic ponds, water storage areas, wastewater treatment areas and rural gardens.

The natural ecosystems and habitats of these species include tundra grasslands, Arctic tundra, temperate grasslands, coastal lagoons, coastal lakes, intertidal shoreline, tidepools, estuaries and freshwater lakes.

Diet and feeding behavior

The diet of the common sandpiper species consists mainly of invertebrates. Insects, insect larvae, crustaceans, molluscs, annelids and spiders are their primary food. These species occasionally take small vertebrates and seeds.

Reproduction and breeding habits

The breeding season of this sandpiper species is from May to July in most of its breeding range. These species are mostly monogamous. In some instances polyandry has been observed.

The nesting sites are located in sandy, rocky margins of rivers and waterbodies. The nest is a shallow scrape on the ground and the clutch contains 3 to 6 white eggs with brown blotches.

Migration and movement patterns

The common sandpiper species is fully migratory. The breeding populations occur in Arctic, subarctic and temperate regions of Europe and Asia. After breeding and rearing the young, they migrate southwards.

These sandpiper species winter in sub-saharan Africa, coastal Arabian peninsula, Indian subcontinent, southern parts of China, Southeast Asia and Australia. The return migration to the breeding grounds takes place in early summer.

Common sandpiper - Quick Facts

  • Scientific name: Actitis hypoleucos
  • Species author: (Linnaeus, 1758)
  • Synonyms/Protonym: Tringa Hypoleucos Linnaeus, 1758
  • Family: Scolopacidae › Charadriiformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • , Vernacular names: English: Common sandpiper, Chinese: 矶鹬, French: Chevalier guignette, German: Flussuferläufer, Spanish: Andarríos chico, Russian: Перевозчик, Japanese: イソシギ
  • Other names: Common Sandpiper, Eurasian Sandpiper
  • Distribution: Asia, Europe, Africa, Indian Subcontinent, southeast Asia, Australia
  • Diet and feeding habits: insects, spiders, molluscs, crustaceans, invertebrates, small vertebrates
  • IUCN status listing: Least Concern (LC)

Conservation and survival

The global population size of the common sandpiper (Actitis hypoleucos) is estimated to number about 2,600,000 to 3,200,000 individual birds (Wetlands International 2015). The overall population trend of the species is considered to be decreasing.

In most of its range, this species is reported to be widespread and common. The generation length is 6.8 years. Its distribution size is about 47,200,000 sq.km.

Habitat alteration, climate change, severe weather, human disturbance, recreational activities and trapping of adults and juveniles for pet-trade are the main threats that are endangering the survival of this sandpiper species.

IUCN and CITES status

The common sandpiper (Actitis hypoleucos) does not approach the thresholds for being Vulnerable, either under the range size criterion, or under the population trend criterion or under the population size criterion.

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated the sandpiper species and has listed it as of "Least Concern".

The CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) status is ‘Not Evaluated’ for the common sandpiper (Actitis hypoleucos).
Taxonomy and scientific classification of Actitis hypoleucos
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Charadriiformes
Family:Scolopacidae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Actitis
Species:A. hypoleucos
Binomial name:Actitis hypoleucos
IUCN status listing:
Least Concern
The common sandpiper (Actitis hypoleucos) is closely related to the spotted sandpiper (Actitis macularius).
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1.Image source: https://wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Common_Sandpiper_Actitis_hypoleucos_by_Dr._Raju_Kasambe_DSCN3001_(19).jpg (cropped)
Author: Dr. Raju Kasambe | License: CC BY-SA 4.0 as on 10/17/18
2.Image source: https://wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Actitis_hypoleucos_2.jpg (cropped)
Author: Vengolis | License: CC BY-SA 3.0 as on 10/17/18
3.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/juan_e/5012875116/ (cropped)
Author: Juan Emilio | License: CC BY-SA 2.0 as on 10/17/18
Detailed description and information on distribution, habitat, behavior, feeding and breeding habits, migration and conservation status of beautiful birds with their images.
Recently updated and current topic in Bird World: Common sandpiper - Actitis hypoleucos.
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Emperor goose images


   ›      ›   Emperor goose - Anser canagicus images
Taxonomic classification   < >   Images

The emperor goose (Anser canagicus) belongs to the family Anatidae under the order Anseriformes.

Emperor goose taxonomy

The Anatidae is the family of ducks, teals, goose and swans. The family Anatidae was first introduced by William Elford Leach, MD, FRS (2 February 1791 – 25 August 1836), an English zoologist and marine biologist, in the year 1820.

The family Anatidae comprises seven subfamilies, including Anserinae. The subfamily Anserinae was first described by Nicholas Aylward Vigors (1785 – 26 October 1840), an Irish zoologist, in the year 1825.

The subfamily Anserinae is polytypic and contains three genera, viz., Cygnus, Anser and Branta. The genus Anser was first introduced by Carl Linnaeus (23 May 1707 – 10 January 1778), a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist, in the year 1758.

The genus Anser is polytypic and comprises eleven species, including Anser canagicus. The species Anser canagicus is monotypic. The goose species Anser canagicus was first described by Sevastianov, in the year 1802.

Taxonomic classification
Binomial name:Anser canagicus
Species:A. canagicus
Genus:Anser
Subfamily:-
Family:Anatidae
Order:Anseriformes
Class:Aves
Phylum:Chordata
Kingdom:Animalia
Emperor goose - Anser canagicus
1.Emperor goose - Anser canagicus
Image by Tony Hisgett


Anser canagicus
2.Emperor goose - Anser canagicus
Image by Ken Billington/http://focusingonwildlife.com/

Anser canagicus
3.Emperor goose - Anser canagicus
Image by Ken Billington/http://focusingonwildlife.com/

Anser canagicus
4.Emperor goose - Anser canagicus
Image by 4028mdk09

Anser canagicus
5.Emperor goose - Anser canagicus
Image by SandyCole

Anser canagicus
6.Emperor goose - Anser canagicus
Image by DickDaniels (http://carolinabirds.org/)

Anser canagicus
7.Emperor goose - Anser canagicus
Image by Frank Vincentz

Anser canagicus
8.Anser canagicus
Image by Mike Prince

Anser canagicus
9.Anser canagicus
Image by Tim Bowman, USFWS
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1.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/hisgett/5370597811/ (cropped)
Author: Tony Hisgett | License: CC BY 2.0 as on 10/16/18
2.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Emperor_Goose_(Chen_canagica)_(3).JPG (cropped)
Author: Ken Billington/http://focusingonwildlife.com/ | License: CC BY-SA 3.0 as on 10/16/18
3.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/ (cropped)
Author: Ken Billington/http://focusingonwildlife.com/ | License: CC BY-SA 3.0 as on 10/16/18
4.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Wasservogel_2010.JPG (cropped)
Author: 4028mdk09 | License: CC BY-SA 3.0 as on 10/16/18
5.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/ (cropped)
Author: SandyCole | License: CC BY-SA 3.0 as on 10/16/18
6.Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/ (cropped)
Author: DickDaniels (http://carolinabirds.org/) | License: CC BY-SA 3.0 as on 10/16/18
7.Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Reichshof_Eckenhagen_-_Park_-_Anser_canagicus_01_ies.jpg (cropped)
Author: Frank Vincentz | License: CC BY-SA 3.0 as on 10/16/18
8.Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikeprince/19142495720/in/photostream/ (cropped)
Author: Mike Prince | License: CC BY 2.0 as on 10/16/18
9.Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/ (cropped)
Author: Tim Bowman, USFWS | License: Public domain
Detailed description and information on distribution, habitat, behavior, feeding and breeding habits, migration and conservation status of beautiful birds with their images.
Recently updated and current topic in Bird World: Emperor goose - Anser canagicus images.
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