Monday, April 30

Green sandpiper photos

   ›      ›   Green sandpiper - Tringa ochropus photos
Taxonomic classification   < >   Photos
The green sandpiper (Tringa ochropus) belongs to the family Scolopacidae under the order Charadriiformes.

Green sandpiper taxonomy

The Scolopacidae is the family of sandpipers, curlews and snipes. The family Scolopacidae was first introduced by Constantine Samuel Rafinesque-Schmaltz (October 22, 1783 – September 18, 1840), a zoologist, botanist, writer and polyglot, in the year 1815.

The family Scolopacidae comprises fifteen genera, including genus Tringa. The genus Tringa was first described by Carl Linnaeus (23 May 1707 – 10 January 1778), a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist, in the year 1758.

"The genus name Tringa is the New Latin name given to the green sandpiper by Aldrovandus in 1599 based on Ancient Greek trungas, a thrush-sized, white-rumped, tail-bobbing wading bird mentioned by Aristotle".

The genus Tringa comprises thirteen species, viz., Tringa ochropus, Tringa solitaria, Tringa brevipes, Tringa incana, Tringa erythropus, Tringa melanoleuca, Tringa nebularia, Tringa semipalmata, Tringa flavipes, Tringa guttifer, Tringa stagnatilis, Tringa totanus and Tringa glareola.

The species Tringa ochropus was first described by Carl Linnaeus in the year 1758. The species Tringa ochropus is monotypic.
Taxonomic classification
Binomial name:Tringa ochropus
Species:T. ochropus
Genus:Tringa
Subfamily:-
Family:Scolopacidae
Order:Charadriiformes
Class:Aves
Phylum:Chordata
Kingdom:Animalia
Green sandpiper - Tringa ochropus
1.Green sandpiper - Tringa ochropus 250
Photo by Dr. Raju Kasambe


Tringa ochropus
2.Green sandpiper - Tringa ochropus
Photo by Charlesjsharp

Tringa ochropus
3.Green sandpiper - Tringa ochropus
Photo by Francesco Veronesi

Tringa ochropus
4.Green sandpiper - Tringa ochropus
Photo by Ferran Pestaña

Tringa ochropus
5.Green sandpiper - Tringa ochropus
Photo by Alpsdake

Tringa ochropus
6.Green sandpiper - Tringa ochropus
Photo by Alpsdake

Tringa ochropus
7.Green sandpiper - Tringa ochropus
Photo by Tony Smith

Tringa ochropus
8.Tringa ochropus
Photo by Dr. Raju Kasambe

Tringa ochropus
9.Tringa ochropus eggs
Photo by Klaus Rassinger und Gerhard Cammerer
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1.Photo source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Green_Sandpiper_Tringa_ochropus_by_Dr._Raju_Kasambe_DSCN0314_(10).jpg (cropped)
Photo author: Dr. Raju Kasambe | License: CC BY-SA 4.0 as on 4/29/18
2.Photo source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Green_sandpiper_(Tringa_ochropus).jpg (cropped)
Author: Charlesjsharp | License: CC BY-SA 4.0 as on 4/29/18
3.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/francesco_veronesi/14738362234/ (cropped)
Author: Francesco Veronesi | License: CC BY-SA 2.0 as on 4/29/18
4.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ferranp/461974827/ (cropped)
Author: Ferran Pestaña | License: CC BY-SA 2.0 as on 4/29/18
5.Photo source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tringa_ochropus.JPG (cropped)
Author: Alpsdake | License: CC BY-SA 3.0 as on 4/29/18
6.Photo source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tringa_ochropus_a2.JPG (cropped)
Author: Alpsdake | License: CC BY-SA 3.0 as on 4/29/18
7.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pc_plod/6038952240/ (cropped)
Author: Tony Smith | License: CC BY 2.0 as on 4/29/18
8.Photo source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/ (cropped)
Author: Dr. Raju Kasambe | License: CC BY-SA 4.0 as on 4/29/18
9.Photo source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Tringa_ochropus_MWNH_0209.JPG (cropped)
Author: Klaus Rassinger und Gerhard Cammerer | License: CC BY-SA 3.0 as on 4/29/18
Current topic in Birds of India: Green sandpiper - Tringa ochropus photos.
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Sunday, April 29

Green sandpiper

   ›      ›   Green sandpiper - Tringa ochropus

The green sandpiper (Tringa ochropus) belongs to the family of snipes and sandpipers, the Scolopacidae.

The green sandpiper species is distributed in subarctic Eurasia, southern Europe, tropical Africa, Arabian peninsula, Indian subcontinent and southeast Asia. These sandpiper species are fully migratory. These sandpipers are monotypic species.
Overview & Quick Facts Description & Identification
Pictures of Green Sandpiper Distribution & Range
Ecosystem & Habitat Diet & Feeding Behavior
Breeding Habits Migration & Movement Patterns
Conservation & Survival IUCN Status
Taxonomy & Classification Bird World

Appearance, physical description and identification

The green sandpiper (Tringa ochropus) is a medium-sized sandpiper, measuring 20 to 25 cm in length and weighing 50 to 120 grams. The wingspan is 55 to 60 cm.

The head, back and upperparts are grayish brown. The rump is white. The foreneck, breast and upper flanks streaked gray-brown. The underparts are white. The back and wings have varying degree of white spots. There is white supercilium and dark brown lore.

The bill is greenish brown with darker distal end. The irises are dark brown. There is a white eye-ring. The legs are greenish gray. The call of these green sandpiper species is a characteristic three-note, sustained, melodious, whistling sound.
Indian birds - Photo of Green sandpiper - Tringa ochropus
1.Birds of India - Image of Green sandpiper - Tringa ochropus by Charlesjsharp


Birds of India - Image of Green sandpiper - Tringa ochropus
2.Indian birds - Image of Green sandpiper - Tringa ochropus by Dr. Raju Kasambe

Indian birds - Image of Green sandpiper - Tringa ochropus
3.Birds of India - Image of Green sandpiper - Tringa ochropus by

Origin, geographical range and distribution

These green sandpiper species are distributed in subarctic Europe, subarctic Russia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, northern Mongolia, extreme northwest, southeast and northeast China, tropical Africa, Arabian peninsula, Indian subcontinent and southeast Asia.

The Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBA) of these green sandpiper species in Kazakhstan is Paradise Valley mountain plateau. The IBA of these species in Brunei is Wasan.

Some of the IBA of these sandpiper species in Russia are Watershed of the Mulym'ya and Bolshoy Tap rivers, Ust'-Ozerninskiye bogs, Russkoye lake, Ozersky pine forest, Kondo-Alymskaya, Kataiginskiye bogs, East slope of the Northern Ural and Forty islands.

Ecosystem and habitat

These green sandpiper species have medium forest dependence. They normally occur in altitudes from 0 to 2,500 meters.

The artificial ecosystems and habitats of these green sandpiper species include cultivated lands, pasturelands, canals, drains, aquaculture ponds, flooded fields and rural gardens.

The natural ecosystems and habitats of these sandpiper species include boreal forests, tropical and subtropical montane forests, flooded grasslands, wetlands, marshes, swamps, freshwater lakes, rivers, streams and creeks.

Diet and feeding behavior

The diet of these green sandpiper species consists mainly of invertebrates. Aquatic and terrestrial insects, insect larvae, annelids, small crustaceans, spiders and fish are their primary food.

These species locate the prey by sight and also by probing the ground with their long bill. They glean the prey from moist surface or probe the wet ground and shallow waters for prey.

Reproduction and breeding habits

The breeding season of these green sandpiper species is from April to June in most of their breeding ranges. These species are monogamous and highly territorial. The sandpiper nesting sites are located high up on trees in montane forests, boreal forests and pine forests.

These green sandpipers nest in the abandoned nests of passerine birds and in natural platforms. The clutch contains 2-4 pale buff colored eggs with dark patches. Both the parents incubate the eggs. The chicks hatch out after 21 days of incubation.

Migration and movement patterns

These green sandpiper species are fully migratory birds. The breeding populations occur across subarctic Europe and Asia, Kyrgyzstan and extreme northwest China. The southward migration to wintering grounds takes place from late-June to October.

These species spend their winter in tropical Africa, Arabian peninsula, Indian subcontinent and southeast Asia. They return to the breeding grounds between February and mid-May (Urban et al. 1986, del Hoyo et al. 1996).

Green sandpiper - Quick Facts

  • Scientific name: Tringa ochropus
  • Species author: Linnaeus, 1758
  • Synonyms/Protonym: Tringa Ocrophus Linnaeus, 1758
  • Family: Scolopacidae › Charadriiformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • Vernacular names: English: Green sandpiper, Chinese: 白腰草鹬, French: Chevalier cul-blanc, German: Waldwasserläufer, Spanish: Andarríos grande, Russian: Черныш, Japanese: クサシギ, Indonesian: Trinil Hijau
  • Other names: Green Sandpiper
  • Distribution: subarctic Eurasia, southern Europe, tropical Africa, Arabian peninsula, Indian subcontinent, southeast Asia
  • Diet and feeding habits: insects, insect larvae, worms, crustaceans, molluscs
  • IUCN status listing: Least Concern (LC)

Conservation and survival

The global population size of the green sandpiper (Tringa ochropus) is estimated to number about 1,200,000 to 3,600,000 individual birds. The overall population trend of the species is considered to be increasing.

In most of its range, this species is reported to be common to uncommon. The generation length is 5.6 years. Its distribution size is about 24,600,000 sq.km.

Habitat alteration and destruction, agricultural expansion, loss of wetlands, human intrusions and disturbance, hunting and susceptibility to avian influenza are the main threats that are endangering the survival of these sandpiper species.

IUCN and CITES status

The green sandpiper (Tringa ochropus) does not approach the thresholds for being Vulnerable, either under the range size criterion, or under the population trend criterion or under the population size criterion.

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated the sandpiper species and has listed it as of "Least Concern".

The CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) status is ‘Not Evaluated’ for the green sandpiper (Tringa ochropus).
Taxonomy and scientific classification of Tringa ochropus
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Charadriiformes
Family:Scolopacidae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Tringa
Species:T. ochropus
Binomial name:Tringa ochropus
IUCN status listing:
Least Concern
The green sandpiper (Tringa ochropus) is closely related to the solitary sandpiper (Tringa solitaria). Formerly green sandpiper was considered conspecific with solitary sandpiper (T. solitaria) of North America.
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1.Image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Green_sandpiper_(Tringa_ochropus).jpg (cropped)
Image author: Charlesjsharp | License: CC BY-SA 4.0 as on 4/29/18
2.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Green_Sandpiper_Tringa_ochropus_by_Dr._Raju_Kasambe_DSCN0314_(10).jpg (cropped)
Image author: Dr. Raju Kasambe | License: CC BY-SA 4.0 as on 4/29/18
3.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/francesco_veronesi/14738362234/ (cropped)
Image author: Francesco Veronesi | License: CC BY-SA 2.0 as on 4/29/18
Current topic in Birds of India: Green sandpiper - Tringa ochropus.
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Saturday, April 28

Lesser sand-plover images

   ›      ›   Lesser sand-plover - Charadrius mongolus images
Taxonomic classification   < >   Images
The lesser sand plover (Charadrius mongolus) belongs to the family Charadriidae under the order Charadriiformes.

Lesser sand-plover taxonomy

The Charadriidae is the family of dotterels and lapwings. The family Charadriidae was first described by William Elford Leach, MD, FRS (2 February 1791 – 25 August 1836), an English zoologist and marine biologist, in a guide to the contents of the British Museum published in 1820.

The family Charadriidae comprises two subfamilies, Vanellinae and Charadriinae. The subfamily Charadriinae was first introduced by William Elford Leach in the year 1820.

The subfamily Charadriinae comprises eight genera, including genus Charadrius. The genus Charadrius was first described by Carl Linnaeus (23 May 1707 – 10 January 1778), a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist, in the year 1758.

The genus Charadrius comprises 31 species, including Charadrius mongolus. The species Charadrius mongolus was first described by Peter Simon Pallas FRS FRSE (22 September 1741 – 8 September 1811), a zoologist and botanist, in the year 1776.
Taxonomic classification
Binomial name:Charadrius mongolus
Species:C. mongolus
Genus:Charadrius
Subfamily:-
Family:Charadriidae
Order:Charadriiformes
Class:Aves
Phylum:Chordata
Kingdom:Animalia
Lesser sand-plover - Charadrius mongolus
1.Lesser sand-plover - Charadrius mongolus 346
Image by JJ Harrison


Charadrius mongolus
2.Lesser sand-plover - Charadrius mongolus
Image by JJ Harrison

Charadrius mongolus
3.Lesser sand-plover - Charadrius mongolus
Image by Alpsdake

Charadrius mongolus
4.Lesser sand-plover - Charadrius mongolus
Image by Alpsdake

Charadrius mongolus
5.Lesser sand-plover - Charadrius mongolus
Image by Alpsdake

Charadrius mongolus
6.Lesser sand-plover - Charadrius mongolus
Image by Alnus

Charadrius mongolus
7.Lesser sand-plover - Charadrius mongolus
Image by Jason Thompson

Charadrius mongolus
8.Lesser sand-plover - Charadrius mongolus
Image by 孫鋒 林

Charadrius mongolus
9.Lesser sand-plover - Charadrius mongolus
Image by Tony Morris
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1.Lesser sand-plover image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Charadrius_mongolus_-_Laem_Pak_Bia.jpg (cropped)
Author: JJ Harrison | License: CC BY 3.0 as on 4/27/18
2.Image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Charadrius_mongolus_-_Laem_Phak_Bia.jpg (cropped)
Author: JJ Harrison | License: CC BY 3.0 as on 4/27/18
3.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Charadrius_mongolus_stegmanni_eating.JPG (cropped)
Author: Alpsdake | License: CC BY-SA 3.0 as on 4/27/18
4.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Charadrius_mongolus_stegmanni_eating_ragworm.JPG (cropped)
Author: Alpsdake | License: CC BY-SA 3.0 as on 4/27/18
5.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Charadrius_mongolus_stegmanni_front.JPG (cropped)
Author: Alpsdake | License: CC BY-SA 3.0 as on 4/27/18
6.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Charadrius_mongolus_P4233532.jpg (cropped)
Author: Alnus | License: CC BY-SA 3.0 as on 4/27/18
7.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/79492850@N00/7124636955/ (cropped)
Author: Jason Thompson | License: CC BY 2.0 as on 4/27/18
8.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/outdoor_birding/31805816004/ (cropped)
Author: 孫鋒 林 | License: CC BY-SA 2.0 as on 4/27/18
9.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/tonymorris/20537292472/ (cropped)
Image author: Tony Morris | License: CC BY-NC 2.0 as on 4/27/18
Current topic in Birds of India: Lesser sand-plover - Charadrius mongolus images.
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Friday, April 27

Lesser sand-plover

   ›      ›   Lesser sand-plover - Charadrius mongolus

The lesser sand plover (Charadrius mongolus) belongs to the family of lapwings and plovers, the Charadriidae.

The lesser sand plover species is distributed in Africa, Arabian peninsula, Indian subcontinent, southeast Asia, Australia, China and northeast Russia. These plover species are fully migratory. These plovers are polytypic species.
Overview & Quick Facts Description & Identification
Pictures of Lesser Sand-plover Distribution & Range
Ecosystem & Habitat Diet & Feeding Behavior
Breeding Habits Migration & Movement Patterns
Conservation & Survival IUCN Status
Taxonomy & Classification Bird World

Appearance, physical description and identification

The lesser sand plover (Charadrius mongolus) is a small to medium-sized plover, measuring 17 to 22 cm in length and weighing 40 to 110 grams. The wingspan is 45 to 60 cm.

The breeding male lesser sand plover has gray-brown crown, nape and upperparts. The sides of the neck and hindneck are chestnut. A broad black mask extends from the base of the bill to ear coverts, passing through the eyes.

There is a dark brown stripe above the forehead. The underparts are white. The female lesser sand plover has dark grey-brown or rufous mask. There is no dark stripe on the forehead. In non breeding plumage, the black and chestnut marks become gray-brown.

The bill is black. The irises are dark brown. There is a white eye-ring. The legs are dark gray. The call of these lesser sand plover species is a short, hard "drrrit" or a hard trilling sound.
Indian birds - Photo of Lesser sand-plover - Charadrius mongolus
1.Birds of India - Image of Lesser sand-plover - Charadrius mongolus by JJ Harrison


Birds of India - Image of Lesser sand-plover - Charadrius mongolus
2.Indian birds - Image of Lesser sand-plover - Charadrius mongolus by JJ Harrison

Indian birds - Image of Lesser sand-plover - Charadrius mongolus
3.Birds of India - Image of Lesser sand-plover - Charadrius mongolus by Alpsdake

Origin, geographical range and distribution

These lesser sand plover species are distributed in eastern coastal Africa, south coastal Arabia, coastal Indian subcontinent, coastal southeast Asia, coastal Australia, Himalayan region, central Asia, central and western China and eastern Russia.

The lesser sand plover nominate subspecies C. m. mongolus is distributed in far east Russia and winters in Taiwan and Australia. The subspecies C. m. schaeferi is distributed in south Mongolia and central China. It winters in Thailand and Indonesia.

The lesser sand plover subspecies C. m. atrifrons breeds in Himalayas and southern Tibetan Plateau and winters in India and Indonesia (Sumatra). The lesser sand plover subspecies C. m. pamirensis breeds in central Asia and winters in Africa and western India.

The plover subspecies C. m. stegmanni is distributed in northeast Siberia and winters in Taiwan, Philippines, Papua New Guinea and surrounding islands and Australia.

The Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBA) of these lesser sand plover species in Australia are Great Sandy Strait and Gulf Plains. The IBA in China are Laizhou Wan, Yalu Jiang Estuary and Ulungur Hu and Jili Hu.

The IBA of these lesser sand plovers in India are Mahul - Sewri Creek and Kaliveli Tank and Yeduyanthittu estuary. The IBA in Russia are Aniva bay, Tyk and Viakhtu bays, Nevskoye Lake, Ola lagoon and North-east Sakhalin lagoons.

The IBA of these plovers in United Arab Emirates are Marawah Island, Khor Al Jazirah, Khor Al Beidah, Bu Tinah and Ba Al Ghaylam. The IBA of plovers in Saudi Arabia are Tarut Bay, Sabkhat al-Fasl lagoons, Jizan Bay and Farasan Islands.

Ecosystem and habitat

These lesser sand plover species have low forest dependence. They normally occur in altitudes from 0 to 5,500 meters. The artificial ecosystems and habitats of these species include cultivated lands.

The natural ecosystems and habitats of these lesser sand plover species include tundra grasslands, high altitude grasslands, wetlands, swamps, marshes, estuaries, tidepools, intertidal mudflats, beaches and coastal dunes.

Diet and feeding behavior

The diet of these lesser sand plover species consists mainly of invertebrates. Molluscs (mostly bivalves), polychaete worms, crustaceans like crabs (del Hoyo et al. 1996) and amphipods and insects (beetles, insect larvae) are their primary food.

These lesser sand plover species locate the prey by sight. They glean the prey from moist surface or probe the wet ground for prey. They mostly use the typical run-stop-peck method of feeding.

Reproduction and breeding habits

The breeding season of these lesser sand plover species is during May and June in most of their breeding ranges. These species are monogamous and highly territorial.

The sand plover nesting sites include, plains above the tree-line on mountains, elevated tundra and mountain steppe, dry edges of salt-marshes and shingle beaches.

The lesser sand plover's nest is an unlined shallow scrape on the ground. The clutch contains three eggs. The eggs are incubated by both the parents. The chicks hatch out after 22-24 days of incubation. The hatchlings are precocial and fledge after 30–35 days.

Migration and movement patterns

These lesser sand plover species are fully migratory birds. The breeding populations occur in northern range of their distribution. The adults leave the breeding grounds by August, followed by the juveniles in September.

These plovers migrate southwards for wintering. The return migration to the breeding grounds occur in April and May. One year old birds often remain back in the wintering grounds (Hayman et al. 1986, del Hoyo et al. 1996). The subspecies have different breeding and wintering ranges.

Lesser sand-plover - Quick Facts

  • Scientific name: Charadrius mongolus
  • Species author: Pallas, 1776
  • Synonyms/Protonym: Charadrius mongolus Pallas, 1776
  • Family: Charadriidae › Charadriiformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • Vernacular names: English: Lesser sand-plover, Chinese: 蒙古沙鸻, French: Pluvier de Mongolie, German: Mongolenregenpfeifer, Spanish: Chorlitejo mongol chico, Russian: Монгольский зуёк, Japanese: メダイチドリ
  • Other names: Lesser Sand Plover
  • Distribution: Africa, Arabian peninsula, Indian subcontinent, southeast Asia, Australia, China, northeast Russia
  • Diet and feeding habits: insects, worms, crustaceans, molluscs
  • IUCN status listing: Least Concern (LC)

Conservation and survival

The global population size of the lesser sand plover (Charadrius mongolus) is estimated to number about 310,000 to 390,000 individual birds. The overall population trend of the species is not known.

In most of its range, this plover species is reported to be common to uncommon. The generation length is 5.2 years. Its distribution size is about 47,100,000 sq.km.

Habitat alteration and destruction, agricultural expansion, loss of wetlands and human intrusions and disturbance are the main threats that are endangering the survival of these plover species.

IUCN and CITES status

The lesser sand plover (Charadrius mongolus) does not approach the thresholds for being Vulnerable, either under the range size criterion, or under the population trend criterion or under the population size criterion.

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated the plover species and has listed it as of "Least Concern".

The CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) status is ‘Not Evaluated’ for the lesser sand plover (Charadrius mongolus).
Taxonomy and scientific classification of Charadrius mongolus
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Charadriiformes
Family:Charadriidae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Charadrius
Species:C. mongolus
Binomial name:Charadrius mongolus
IUCN status listing:
Least Concern
The five recognized subspecies of the lesser sand plover (Charadrius mongolus) are: C. m. mongolus Pallas, 1776, C. m. schaeferi Meyer de Schauensee, 1937, C. m. atrifrons Wagler, 1829, C. m. pamirensis (Richmond, 1896) and C. m. stegmanni Portenko, 1939.
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1.Lesser sand-plover image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Charadrius_mongolus_-_Laem_Phak_Bia.jpg (cropped)
Image author: JJ Harrison | License: CC BY 3.0 as on 4/27/18
2.Image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Charadrius_mongolus_-_Laem_Pak_Bia.jpg (cropped)
Image author: JJ Harrison | License: CC BY 3.0 as on 4/27/18
3.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Charadrius_mongolus_stegmanni_eating.JPG (cropped)
Image author: Alpsdake | License: CC BY-SA 3.0 as on 4/27/18
Current topic in Birds of India: Lesser sand-plover - Charadrius mongolus.
Contact State Tourism or travel agents for bird watching and wildlife tours.

Thursday, April 26

Indian paradise flycatcher images

   ›      ›   Indian paradise flycatcher - Terpsiphone paradisi images
Taxonomic classification   < >   Images
The Indian paradise flycatcher (Terpsiphone paradisi) belongs to the family Monarchidae under the order Passeriformes.

Indian paradise flycatcher taxonomy

The family Monarchidae comprises about 100 monarch passerine birds. The family Monarchidae was first described by Charles Lucien Jules Laurent Bonaparte (24 May 1803 – 29 July 1857), a French biologist and ornithologist, in the year 1854.

The family Monarchidae comprise two subfamilies, Terpsiphoninae (four genera) and Monarchinae (12 genera). The subfamily Terpsiphoninae comprises four genera, viz., Hypothymis, Eutrichomyias, Trochocercus and Terpsiphone.

The genus Terpsiphone was first described by Constantin Wilhelm Lambert Gloger (17 September – 30 December 1863), a German zoologist and ornithologist, in the year 1827.

The genus Terpsiphone comprises sixteen species, including Terpsiphone paradisi. The species Terpsiphone paradisi was first described (as Corvus paradisi) by Carl Linnaeus (23 May 1707 – 10 January 1778), a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist, in the year 1758.
Taxonomic classification
Binomial name:Terpsiphone paradisi
Species:T. paradisi
Genus:Terpsiphone
Subfamily:-
Family:Monarchidae
Order:Passeriformes
Class:Aves
Phylum:Chordata
Kingdom:Animalia
Indian paradise flycatcher - Terpsiphone paradisi
1.Indian paradise flycatcher - Terpsiphone paradisi 262
Image by soumyajit nandy


Terpsiphone paradisi
2.Indian paradise flycatcher - Terpsiphone paradisi
Image by Steve Garvie

Terpsiphone paradisi
3.Indian paradise flycatcher - Terpsiphone paradisi
Image by N A Nazeer

Terpsiphone paradisi
4.Indian paradise flycatcher - Terpsiphone paradisi
Image by Rehman Abubakr

Terpsiphone paradisi
5.Indian paradise flycatcher - Terpsiphone paradisi
Image by Koshy Koshy

Terpsiphone paradisi
6.Indian paradise flycatcher - Terpsiphone paradisi
Image by J.M.Garg

Terpsiphone paradisi
7.Indian paradise flycatcher - Terpsiphone paradisi
Image by Thimindu Goonatillake

Terpsiphone paradisi
8.Indian paradise flycatcher - Terpsiphone paradisi
Image by ALOK KUMAR MEHER

Terpsiphone paradisi
9.Terpsiphone paradisi
Image by AshishTripurwar
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1.Indian paradise flycatcher image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/snandy_81/15099910331/ (cropped)
Author: soumyajit nandy | License: CC BY-SA 2.0 as on 4/25/18
2.Image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Terpsiphone_paradisi_-near_Amaya_Lake,_Dambulla,_Sri_Lanka-8.jpg (cropped)
Author: Steve Garvie | License: CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 as on 4/25/18
3.Image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/ (cropped)
Author: N A Nazeer | License: CC BY-SA 2.5 IN as on 4/25/18
4.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/ (cropped)
Author: Rehman Abubakr | License: CC BY-SA 4.0 as on 4/25/18
5.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Terpsiphone_paradisi_-Nandi_Hills,_Karnataka,_India_-male-8.jpg (cropped)
Author: Koshy Koshy | License: CC BY 2.0 as on 4/25/18
6.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/ (cropped)
Author: J.M.Garg | License: CC BY 3.0 as on 4/25/18
7.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/51327488@N00/5319925307 (cropped)
Author: Thimindu Goonatillake | License: CC BY-SA 2.0 as on 4/25/18
8.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/ (cropped)
Author: ALOK KUMAR MEHER | License: CC BY-SA 4.0 as on 4/25/18
9.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/ (cropped)
Author: AshishTripurwar | License: CC BY-SA 4.0 as on 4/25/18
Current topic: Indian paradise flycatcher - Terpsiphone paradisi images.
Contact State Tourism or travel agents for bird watching and wildlife tours.