Golden-winged warbler images

   ›      ›   Golden-winged warbler - Vermivora chrysoptera images

The golden-winged warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera) belongs to the family Parulidae under the order Passeriformes.

Golden-winged warbler taxonomy

The Parulidae is the family of New World warblers or wood-warblers. The family Parulidae was first described by Frank Alexander Wetmore (June 18, 1886 – December 7, 1978), an American ornithologist and avian paleontologist, in the year 1947.

The family Parulidae comprises seventeen genera, including genus Vermivora. The genus Vermivora comprises three species, viz., Vermivora bachmanii, Vermivora cyanoptera and Vermivora chrysoptera.

The genus Vermivora was first introduced by William John Swainson FLS, FRS (8 October 1789 – 6 December 1855[1]), was an English ornithologist, malacologist, conchologist and entomologist, in the year 1827.

The species Vermivora chrysoptera was first introduced (as Motacilla chrysoptera) by Carl Linnaeus (23 May 1707 – 10 January 1778), a Swedish botanist, physician and and zoologist, in the year 1766. The species Vermivora chrysoptera is monotypic.

Taxonomic classification
Binomial name:Vermivora chrysoptera
Species:V. chrysoptera
Genus:Vermivora
Subfamily:-
Family:Parulidae
Order:Passeriformes
Class:Aves
Phylum:Chordata
Kingdom:Animalia
Golden-winged warbler - Vermivora chrysoptera
1.Golden-winged warbler - Vermivora chrysoptera
Image by Bettina Arrigoni


Vermivora chrysoptera
2.Golden-winged warbler - Vermivora chrysoptera
Image by California Department of Fish and Wildlife

Vermivora chrysoptera
3.Golden-winged warbler - Vermivora chrysoptera
Image by Kent McFarland

Vermivora chrysoptera
4.Golden-winged warbler - Vermivora chrysoptera
Image by Kent McFarland

Vermivora chrysoptera
5.Golden-winged warbler - Vermivora chrysoptera
Image by Andrew Cannizzaro

Vermivora chrysoptera
6.Golden-winged warbler - Vermivora chrysoptera
Image by Andy Reago & Chrissy McClarren

Vermivora chrysoptera
7.Vermivora chrysoptera
Image by Bettina Arrigoni

Vermivora chrysoptera
8.Vermivora chrysoptera
Image by William H. Majoros

Vermivora chrysoptera
9.Golden-winged warbler - Vermivora chrysoptera
Image by Paul Hurtado
Popular posts in Bird World
Small minivet Common ringed plover
Spotted redshank Roseate tern
Thick-billed green pigeon Andaman hawk-owl (Andaman boobook)
Great spotted woodpecker White-bellied minivet
Brown-fronted woodpecker Pied triller
Jungle owlet Bar-tailed godwit
Sandwich tern Grey-fronted green pigeon
Lesser coucal Forest owlet
Blue-eared barbet Fulvous-breasted woodpecker
Mew gull Rosy minivet
Indian pitta Whimbrel
Great crested tern Ashy-headed green pigeon

1.Golden-winged warbler image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigoni/41190419195/in/photostream/ (cropped)
Author: Bettina Arrigoni | License: CC BY 2.0 as on 11/13/18
2.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/californiadfg/22436077317/ (cropped)
Author: California Department of Fish and Wildlife | License: CC BY 2.0 as on 11/13/18
3.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/vtebird/5710109295/in/photostream/ (cropped)
Author: Kent McFarland | License: CC BY-NC 2.0 as on 11/13/18
4.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/vtebird/5710110271/ (cropped)
Author: Kent McFarland | License: CC BY-NC 2.0 as on 11/13/18
5.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/acryptozoo/14229915863/ (cropped)
Author: Andrew Cannizzaro | License: CC BY 2.0 as on 11/13/18
6.Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/wildreturn/37454053405/ (cropped)
Author: Andy Reago & Chrissy McClarren | License: CC BY 2.0 as on 11/13/18
7.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigoni/27221201027/in/photostream/ (cropped)
Author: Bettina Arrigoni | License: CC BY 2.0 as on 11/13/18
8.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:8G7D2461.jpg (cropped)
Author: William H. Majoros | License: CC BY-SA 3.0 as on 11/13/18
9.Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pauljhurtado/14373516504/ (cropped)
Author: Paul Hurtado | License: CC BY-SA 2.0 as on 11/13/18
Website for detailed description and information on distribution, habitat, behavior, feeding and breeding habits, migration and conservation status of beautiful birds with their images.


Recently updated and current topic in Bird World: Golden-winged warbler - Vermivora chrysoptera images.

Contact State Tourism or travel agents for bird watching and wildlife tours.

Golden-winged warbler | American birds

   ›      ›   Golden-winged warbler - Vermivora chrysoptera

The golden-winged warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera) belongs to the family of New World warblers, the Parulidae.

The golden-winged warbler is distributed in USA, Canada, Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panamá, Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador and Caribbean islands. These species hybridize with blue-winged warblers. These warblers are monotypic species.

Overview & Quick Facts Description & Identification
Pictures of Golden-winged Warbler Distribution & Range
Ecosystem & Habitat Diet & Feeding Behavior
Breeding Habits Migration & Movement Patterns
Conservation & Survival IUCN Status
Taxonomy & Classification Bird World

Appearance, physical description and identification

The golden-winged warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera) is a small New World warbler, measuring 11 to 12 cm in length and weighing 7 to 12 grams.

The male golden-winged warbler has bright golden-yellow patch on the forecrown. There is also a golden patch on the wing. There is a black throat patch and an black ear patch. There is a white supercilium.

The upperparts are bluish gray and the underparts are whitish gray. In females, the black patches are replaced by grayish patches.

The steel-gray bill is slender and sharp pointed. The legs are gray. The irises are blackish. There is a gray eye-ring. Their call is a trilling buzzy note or a buzzy "chip.. chip" sound.
Bird World - Image of Golden-winged warbler - Vermivora chrysoptera
1.Bird World - Golden-winged warbler - Vermivora chrysoptera
Image by California Department of Fish and Wildlife


Bird World - Image of Golden-winged warbler - Vermivora chrysoptera
2.Bird World - Golden-winged warbler - Vermivora chrysoptera
Image by Bettina Arrigoni

Bird World - Image of Golden-winged warbler - Vermivora chrysoptera
3.Bird World - Golden-winged warbler - Vermivora chrysoptera
Image by Kent McFarland

Origin, geographical range and distribution

The golden-winged warbler is distributed in northern USA, southern Canada, Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador and several Caribbean islands.

Vagrant birds have been recorded in United Kingdom, Trinidad and Tobago, Sint Maarten (Netherlands), Barbados, Curaçao (Netherlands) and French Polynesia.

Ecosystem and habitat

The golden-winged warbler species have moderate forest dependence. They normally occurs in altitudes between 0 to 2000 meters. The artificial ecosystems and habitats of these species include pasturelands.

The natural ecosystems and habitats of these warbler species include tropical and subtropical moist lowland forests, temperate forests, grasslands and shrublands, moist shrublands and wetlands.

Diet and feeding behavior

The diet of these golden-winged warbler species consists mainly of insects. Larval insects, insects, moths, caterpillars, grasshoppers and spiders are their primary food.

They mostly forage for insects in the middle and lower canopy. They occasionally descent to the floor to feed on insects and small invertebrates.

Reproduction and breeding habits

The breeding season of the golden-winged warbler species is from May to July in most of their breeding range. These birds are monogamous and nest solitarily. The breeding habitat is on the ground, hidden in bushes.

The nest is a bulky cup made with grass, rootlets and plant fiber. It is lined with hair, fine grass, shreds of bark and fine rootlets.

These species hybridize with blue-winged warbler to form two distinctive hybrids, the genetically dominant Brewster's warbler and the genetically recessive Lawrence's warbler.

Migration and movement patterns

These warbler species are fully migratory birds. The breeding populations occur in northern USA and southern Canada. They migrate to the wintering grounds in August and September.

The wintering populations of these species are distributed in Central America from southern Mexico to Panama, Caribbean islands and northern parts of South America. The return migration occurs in early summer.

Golden-winged warbler - Quick Facts

  • Scientific name: Vermivora chrysoptera
  • Species author: (Linnaeus, 1766)
  • Synonyms/Protonym: Motacilla chrysoptera Linnaeus, 1766
  • Family: Parulidae › Passeriformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • Vernacular names: English: Golden-winged warbler, Chinese: 金翅虫森莺, French: Paruline à ailes dorées, German: Goldflügel-Waldsänger, Spanish: Reinita alidorada, Russian: Золотистокрылая червеедка, Japanese: キンバネアメリカムシクイ
  • Other names: Golden-winged Warbler
  • Distribution: North America, South America
  • Diet and feeding habits: insects, larval insects, caterpillars, spiders
  • IUCN status listing: Near Threatened (NT)

Conservation and survival

The global population size of the golden-winged warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera) has not been quantified. The overall population trend of the species is considered to be decreasing.

In most of its range, this species is reported to be uncommon. The generation length is 3.8 years. Its distribution size is about 2,080,000 sq.km.

Ecosystem degradation, ecosystem conversion, severe weather, climate change and agricultural expansion are the main threats that may endanger the survival of the warbler species.

IUCN and CITES status

The golden-winged warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera) species is approaching the thresholds for being Vulnerable under the range size criterion, under the population trend criterion and under the population size criterion.

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated the species and has listed it as "Near Threatened".

The CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) status is ‘Not Evaluated’ for the golden-winged warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera).
Taxonomy and scientific classification of Vermivora chrysoptera
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Passeriformes
Family:Parulidae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Vermivora
Species:V. chrysoptera
Binomial name:Vermivora chrysoptera
IUCN status listing:
Near Threatened
The golden-winged warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera) is closely related to the blue-winged warbler (Vermivora cyanoptera).
Popular posts in Bird World
Lesser whistling-duck Oriental stork
White-headed duck Black-necked stork
Bean goose Lesser adjutant
Greater white-fronted goose Greater adjutant
Lesser white-fronted goose Black-headed ibis
Greylag goose Red-naped ibis
Bar-headed goose Glossy ibis
Red-breasted goose Eurasian spoonbill
Ruddy shelduck Grey heron
Common shelduck White-bellied heron

1.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/californiadfg/22436077317/ (cropped)
Image author: California Department of Fish and Wildlife | License: CC BY 2.0 as on 11/3/18
2.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigoni/41190419195/in/photostream/ (cropped)
Image author: Bettina Arrigoni | License: CC BY 2.0 as on 11/3/18
3.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/vtebird/5710109295/in/photostream/ (cropped)
Image author: Kent McFarland | License: CC BY-NC 2.0 as on 11/3/18
Website for detailed description and information on distribution, habitat, behavior, feeding and breeding habits, migration and conservation status of beautiful birds with their images.


Recently updated and current topic in Bird World: Golden-winged warbler - Vermivora chrysoptera

Contact State Tourism or travel agents for bird watching and wildlife tours.

Solitary cacique | American birds

   ›      ›   Solitary cacique - Cacicus solitarius

The solitary cacique (Cacicus solitarius) belongs to the family of oropendolas and caciques, the Icteridae.

The solitary cacique is distributed in Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Brazil, Bolivia, Paraguay, Uruguay and Argentina. These cacique species have complete black plumage. These caciques are monotypic species.

Overview & Quick Facts Description & Identification
Pictures of Solitary Cacique Distribution & Range
Ecosystem & Habitat Diet & Feeding Behavior
Breeding Habits Migration & Movement Patterns
Conservation & Survival IUCN Status
Taxonomy & Classification Bird World

Appearance, physical description and identification

The solitary cacique (Cacicus solitarius) is a medium-sized cacique, measuring 23 to 27 cm in length and weighing 80 to 90 grams.

The solitary cacique has overall black plumage with slight gloss. The head, upperparts, underparts and tail are black. The male birds are slightly larger than the females. The tail is long with a slight fork.

The bill is large, white, chisel-shaped and sharp pointed. The legs are blackish. The irises are brown. There is a gray eye-ring. Their call is a repeated "kwoo.. kwoo.. kwaa.. kwaa" sound.
Bird World - Image of Solitary black cacique - Cacicus solitarius
1.Bird World - Solitary black cacique - Cacicus solitarius
Image by Francesco Veronesi


Bird World - Image of Solitary black cacique - Cacicus solitarius
2.Bird World - Solitary black cacique - Cacicus solitarius
Image by Bernard DUPONT

Bird World - Image of black cacique - Cacicus solitarius
3.Bird World - Solitary black cacique - Cacicus solitarius
Image by Victoria DA.

Bird World - Image of black cacique - Cacicus solitarius
4.Bird World - Solitary black cacique - Cacicus solitarius
Image by Victoria DA.

Bird World - Image of Cacicus solitarius
5.Bird World - Solitary black cacique - Cacicus solitarius
Image by Victoria DA.

Origin, geographical range and distribution

The solitary cacique is distributed over southwest Venezuela, east Colombia, east Ecuador, east Peru, Brazil, central and east Bolivia, Paraguay, west Uruguay and north and east Argentina in South America.

Ecosystem and habitat

The solitary cacique species have moderate forest dependence. They normally occurs in altitudes between 0 to 500 meters.

The natural ecosystems and habitats of these species include tropical and subtropical moist lowland forests, tropical and subtropical mangroves, swamps and flooded forests.

Diet and feeding behavior

The diet of these species consists mainly of invertebrates. Insects, worms, small invertebrates, fruits, berries and nectar are their primary food.

They mostly forage for insects and fruits in the middle and upper canopy. They occasionally descent to the floor to feed on insects and small vertebrates.

Reproduction and breeding habits

The breeding season of the solitary cacique species is from October to January in Brazil. The laying season is from October to December in Argentina. In some cases two broods are raised.

These birds are monogamous and nest solitarily. The breeding habitat includes tall trees. The nest is a hanging nest woven with grass, rootlets and plant fiber.

Migration and movement patterns

These species are non-migratory, resident birds.

Post breeding, the juveniles may disperse and establish in new locations within the range. Within their range they may make local movements for feeding and breeding.

Solitary cacique - Quick Facts

  • Scientific name: Cacicus solitarius
  • Species author: (Vieillot, 1816)
  • Synonyms/Protonym: Cassicus solitarius Vieillot, 1816
  • Family: Icteridae › Passeriformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • Vernacular names: English: Solitary cacique, Chinese: 黑酋长鹂, French: Cassique solitaire, German: Stahlkassike, Spanish: Cacique solitario, Russian: Траурный чёрный кассик, Japanese: アオクロツリスドリ
  • Other names: Solitary Cacique, Solitary black cacique
  • Distribution: South America
  • Diet and feeding habits: insects, small vertebrates, fruits, nectar
  • IUCN status listing: Least Concern (LC)

Conservation and survival

The global population size of the solitary cacique (Cacicus solitarius) has not been quantified. The overall population trend of the species is considered to be stable.

In most of its range, this species is reported to be 'fairly common' (Stotz et al. (1996). The generation length is 4.6 years. Its distribution size is about 12,900,000 sq.km.

Ecosystem degradation, ecosystem conversion and deforestation are the main threats that may endanger the survival of the species.

IUCN and CITES status

The solitary cacique (Cacicus solitarius) species does not approach the thresholds for being Vulnerable either under the range size criterion, or under the population trend criterion or under the population size criterion.

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated the species and has listed it as of "Least Concern".

The CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) status is ‘Not Evaluated’ for the solitary cacique (Cacicus solitarius).
Taxonomy and scientific classification of Cacicus solitarius
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Passeriformes
Family:Icteridae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Cacicus
Species:C. solitarius
Binomial name:Cacicus solitarius
IUCN status listing:
Least Concern
The species Cacicus solitarius is closely related to the Ecuadorian cacique (Cacicus sclateri).
Popular posts in Bird World
Pallid scops owl Sykes's nightjar
Edible-nest swiftlet Indian roller
Common kingfisher South polar skua
Pin-tailed sandgrouse Common wood pigeon
Blossom-headed parakeet Indian cuckoo
Oriental scops owl Large-tailed nightjar
White-rumped spinetail Oriental dollarbird
Blue-eared kingfisher Blue-bearded bee-eater
Common hoopoe Indian skimmer
Pomarine jaeger Chestnut-bellied sandgrouse
Speckled wood pigeon Blue-winged parakeet
Common cuckoo Alexandrine parakeet

1.Image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Solitary_Cacique_-_Pantanal_-_Brazil_H8O0547_(23889343835).jpg (cropped)
Image author: Francesco Veronesi | License: CC BY-SA 2.0 as on 11/3/18
2.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/berniedup/28639940053/ (cropped)
Image author: Bernard DUPONT | License: CC BY-SA 2.0 as on 11/3/18
3.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/30206814@N00/4270297760/
Image author: Victoria DA. | License: CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 as on 11/3/18
4.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/30206814@N00/4269554201/in/photostream/
Image author: Victoria DA. | License: CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 as on 11/3/18
5.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/30206814@N00/4269551683/
Image author: Victoria DA. | License: CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 as on 11/3/18
Website for detailed description and information on distribution, habitat, behavior, feeding and breeding habits, migration and conservation status of beautiful birds with their images.


Recently updated and current topic in Bird World: Solitary cacique - Cacicus solitarius.

Contact State Tourism or travel agents for bird watching and wildlife tours.

Yellow-bellied siskin images

   ›      ›   Yellow-bellied siskin - Spinus xanthogastrus images
Taxonomic classification   < >   Images

The yellow-bellied siskin (Spinus xanthogastrus) belongs to the family Fringillidae under the order Passeriformes.

Yellow-bellied siskin taxonomy

The Fringillidae is the family of siskins, canaries, grosbeaks and euphonias. The family Fringillidae was first introduced by William Elford Leach, MD, FRS (2 February 1791 – 25 August 1836), an English zoologist and marine biologist, in the year 1820.

The family Fringillidae comprises three subfamilies, viz., Fringillinae, Carduelinae and Euphoniinae. The subfamily Carduelinae was first described by Nicholas Aylward Vigors (1785 – 26 October 1840), an Irish zoologist, in the year 1825.

The subfamily Carduelinae comprises 184 species divided into 49 genera, including genus Spinus. The genus Spinus was first described by Carl Ludwig Koch (21 September 1778 – 23 August 1857), a German entomologist and arachnologist, in the year 1816.

The genus Spinus contains twenty siskin species, including Spinus xanthogastrus.

The species siskin S. xanthogastrus was first described by Bernard Amé Léonard du Bus de Gisignies (June 21, 1808 – July 6, 1874), a Dutch ornithologist and paleontologist, in the year 1855.

Taxonomic classification
Binomial name:Spinus xanthogastrus
Species:S. xanthogastrus
Genus:Spinus
Subfamily:-
Family:Fringillidae
Order:Passeriformes
Class:Aves
Phylum:Chordata
Kingdom:Animalia
Yellow-bellied siskin - Spinus xanthogastrus
1.Yellow-bellied siskin - Spinus xanthogastrus
Image by julian londono


Spinus xanthogastrus
2.Yellow-bellied siskin - Spinus xanthogastrus
Image by Alejandro Bayer Tamayo

Spinus xanthogastrus
3.Yellow-bellied siskin - Spinus xanthogastrus
Image by Alejandro Bayer Tamayo

Spinus xanthogastrus
4.Yellow-bellied siskin - Spinus xanthogastrus
Image by Francesco Veronesi

Spinus xanthogastrus
5.Yellow-bellied siskin - Spinus xanthogastrus
Image by Franciscokarriere

Spinus xanthogastrus
6.Yellow-bellied siskin - Spinus xanthogastrus
Image by Gomezprieto

Spinus xanthogastrus
7.Spinus xanthogastrus
Image by Carol Foil

Spinus xanthogastrus
8.Spinus xanthogastrus female
Image by budgora
Popular posts in Bird World
Collared scops owl European nightjar
Slaty-breasted rail Western water rail
Eastern water rail Corncrake
Brown crake White-browed crake
White-breasted waterhen Black-tailed crake
Little crake Baillon's crake
Ruddy-breasted crake Watercock
Common moorhen Common coot
Siberian crane Sarus crane
Common crane Black-necked crane
Hooded crane Slaty-legged crake
Laggar falcon Common buttonquail

1.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/aralcal/4265692522/ (cropped)
Author: julian londono | License: CC BY-SA 2.0 as on 10/31/18
2.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/alejobayer/15660219993/ (cropped)
Author: Alejandro Bayer Tamayo | License: Public domain as on 10/31/18
3.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/alejobayer/15657667804/ (cropped)
Author: Alejandro Bayer Tamayo | License: Public domain as on 10/31/18
4.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Yellow-bellied_Siskin_-_Panama_H8O1647_(22621596138).jpg (cropped)
Author: Francesco Veronesi | License: CC BY-SA 2.0 as on 10/31/18
5.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pajaro,_mielero_comun.jpg (cropped)
Author: Franciscokarriere | License: CC BY-SA 4.0 as on 10/31/18
6.Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Carduelis_xanthogastra.jpg (cropped)
Author: Gomezprieto | License: CC BY-SA 3.0 as on 10/31/18
7.Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/dermoidhome/4133908423/
Author: Carol Foil | License: CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 as on 10/31/18
8.Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/53816456@N08/34773552174/
Author: budgora | License: CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 as on 10/31/18
Website for detailed description and information on distribution, habitat, behavior, feeding and breeding habits, migration and conservation status of beautiful birds with their images.


Recently updated and current topic in Bird World: Yellow-bellied siskin - Spinus xanthogastrus images.

Contact State Tourism or travel agents for bird watching and wildlife tours.

Yellow-bellied siskin | American birds

   ›      ›   Yellow-bellied siskin - Spinus xanthogastrus

The yellow-bellied siskin (Spinus xanthogastrus) belongs to the family of finches and siskins, the Fringillidae.

The yellow-bellied siskin is distributed in Costa Rica, Panama, Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia. These siskin species are being illegally captured for caged-bird trade. These siskins are polytypic species.

Overview & Quick Facts Description & Identification
Pictures of Yellow-bellied Siskin Distribution & Range
Ecosystem & Habitat Diet & Feeding Behavior
Breeding Habits Migration & Movement Patterns
Conservation & Survival IUCN Status
Taxonomy & Classification Bird World

Appearance, physical description and identification

The yellow-bellied siskin (Spinus xanthogastrus) is a small siskin, measuring 10 to 12 cm in length and weighing 11 to 14 grams.

The male yellow-bellied siskin has overall black plumage. The belly region and undertail coverts are yellowish. There is a yellowish patch on the black wing. The females and juveniles have olive green upperparts and pale yellowish green underparts.

The bill is pale gray, short, conical and sharp. The legs are short and grayish. The irises are blackish. There is a pale eye-ring. Their call is a soft whistling, twittering sound.
Bird World - Image of Yellow-bellied siskin - Spinus xanthogastrus
1.Bird World - Yellow-bellied siskin - Spinus xanthogastrus
Image by Alejandro Bayer Tamayo


Bird World - Image of Yellow-bellied siskin - Spinus xanthogastrus
2.Bird World - Yellow-bellied siskin - Spinus xanthogastrus
Image by julian londono

Bird World - Image of Yellow-bellied siskin - Spinus xanthogastrus
3.Bird World - Yellow-bellied siskin - Spinus xanthogastrus
Image by Alejandro Bayer Tamayo

Origin, geographical range and distribution

The yellow-bellied siskin is distributed over Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia in South America. In North America, they occur in Costa Rica and Panama.

The siskin nominate subspecies S. x. xanthogastrus is distributed in Costa Rica, western Panama, north and northwest Venezuela, Colombia, western Ecuador and northwest Peru.

The subspecies S. x. stejnegeri is distributed in southwest Peru and west Bolivia.

Ecosystem and habitat

The yellow-bellied siskin species have low forest dependence. They normally occurs in altitudes between 1400 to 3700 meters.

The artificial ecosystems and habitats of these species include heavily degraded forests and coffee plantations.

The natural ecosystems and habitats of these siskin species include tropical and subtropical moist montane forests, tropical and subtropical high altitude grasslands and high altitude shrublands.

Diet and feeding behavior

The diet of the yellow-bellied siskin species consists mainly of plant matter like seeds and leaves. Berries, insects, leaves and seeds are their primary food.

They mostly forage for insects and flowers in the middle and upper canopy. They occasionally descent to the floor to feed on insects.

Reproduction and breeding habits

The breeding season of the yellow-bellied siskin species is from March to May. These birds are monogamous and territorial. The breeding habitat includes small trees with thick foliage.

The siskin nest is a thick cup woven with rootlets, plant fiber and lichen. The female incubates the eggs. The clutch contains 2-3 white eggs with greenish tinge.

Migration and movement patterns

The yellow-bellied siskin species are non-migratory, resident birds. The populations living in higher elevation move down to lower levels during the winter months.

Post breeding, the juveniles may disperse and establish in new locations within the range. Within their range they may make local movements for feeding and breeding.

Yellow-bellied siskin - Quick Facts

  • Scientific name: Spinus xanthogastrus
  • Species author: ( Du Bus de Gisignies), 1855
  • Synonyms/Protonym: Chrysomitris xanthogastra du Bus de Gisignies, 1855
  • Family: Fringillidae › Passeriformes › Aves › Chordata › Animalia
  • Vernacular names: English: Yellow-bellied siskin Chinese: 黄腹金翅雀, French: Tarin à ventre jaune, German: Gelbbauchzeisig, Spanish: Jilguero ventriamarillo, Russian: Желтобрюхий чиж, Japanese: キバラクロヒワ
  • Other names: Yellow-bellied Siskin
  • Distribution: North America, South America
  • Diet and feeding habits: seeds, insects, flowers
  • IUCN status listing: Least Concern (LC)

Conservation and survival

The global population size of the yellow-bellied siskin (Spinus xanthogastrus) has not been quantified. The overall population trend of the species is considered to be decreasing.

In most of its range, this species is reported to be 'fairly common but patchily distributed' (Stotz et al. 1996). The generation length is 4.2 years. Its distribution size is about 4,480,000 sq.km.

Ecosystem degradation, ecosystem conversion and capture of adult and juvenile bird for pet-trade are the main threats that may endanger the survival of the species.

IUCN and CITES status

The yellow-bellied siskin (Spinus xanthogastrus) species does not approach the thresholds for being Vulnerable either under the range size criterion, or under the population trend criterion or under the population size criterion.

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) has categorized and evaluated the siskin species and has listed it as of "Least Concern".

The CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) status is ‘Not Evaluated’ for the yellow-bellied siskin (Spinus xanthogastrus).
Taxonomy and scientific classification of Spinus xanthogastrus
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Passeriformes
Family:Fringillidae
Subfamily:-
Genus:Spinus
Species:S. xanthogastrus
Binomial name:Spinus xanthogastrus
IUCN status listing:
Least Concern
The yellow-bellied siskin (Spinus xanthogastrus) is closely related to the hooded siskin (Spinus magellanicus).

The two recognized subspecies of the yellow-bellied siskin (Spinus xanthogastrus) are:
Spinus xanthogastrus xanthogastrus (du Bus de Gisignies, 1855) and
Spinus xanthogastrus stejnegeri (Sharpe, 1888).
Popular posts in Bird World
Green-billed malkoha Collared owlet
Lineated barbet White-browed piculet
Western hooded pitta Common woodshrike
White-breasted woodswallow Marshall's iora
Andaman cuckooshrike Long-billed dowitcher
Red-wattled lapwing Lesser black-backed gull
Long-tailed broadbill Common emerald dove
Blue-naped pitta Large woodshrike
Common iora Great snipe
Franklin's gull Barred cuckoo-dove
Blue-faced malkoha Himalayan owl
Brown-headed barbet Speckled piculet

1.Yellow-bellied siskin image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/alejobayer/15660219993/ (cropped)
Image author: Alejandro Bayer Tamayo | License: Public domain as on 10/31/18
2.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/aralcal/4265692522/ (cropped)
Image author: julian londono | License: CC BY-SA 2.0 as on 10/31/18
3.Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/alejobayer/15657667804/ (cropped)
Image author: Alejandro Bayer Tamayo | License: Public domain as on 10/31/18
Website for detailed description and information on distribution, habitat, behavior, feeding and breeding habits, migration and conservation status of beautiful birds with their images.


Recently updated and current topic in Bird World: Yellow-bellied siskin - Spinus xanthogastrus.

Contact State Tourism or travel agents for bird watching and wildlife tours.